"The Phosphorescent Blues" by the Punch Brothers

The Punch Brothers
The Phosphorescent Blues
Nonesuch Records
4½ stars (out of 5)

By Chris Shouse

Music is fickle. Music is emotional. Good music can come with any label, or no label at all. All three prerequisites for music are covered with the fourth studio album by the Punch Brothers, The Phosphorescent Blues, an emotional album that requires a complete listen in order of the tracks, similar to a book. Similar to a good book, each title is like a chapter in a book leading to the climax with protagonists and antagonists.

(In case you didn’t know, phosphorescence is when something glows with light without becoming hot to the touch, like the glow-in-the-dark stars on a teenagers bedroom ceiling.)

I’ve seen the Punch Brothers several times in concerts and festivals throughout the country and have always been a fan since hearing their first album. Mandolin magus Chris Thile and the boys—Gabe Witcher (fiddle), Noam Pikelny (banjo), Chris Eldridge (guitar), and Paul Kowert (bass)— might just be one of the most talented groups of bluegrass musicians ever assembled, but that doesn’t automatically make for a great band. Without a doubt, these guys have a unique musical ability to work together as a cohesive unit to create music that is fascinating, inspirational, and motivating.

Produced by T Bone Burnett, The Phosphorescent Blues begins with the 10-minute plus melody “Familiarity” that includes a variety of effects, chamber harmonies, and classical tinges. This song sets a tone that carries though the rest of this album, almost making it a concept album. “Julep” is a tale of drinking a mint julep on the front porch, a perfect song to show off the way each member of the band plays interdependent roles that when blended together create a cohesive work. “I Blew It Off” is a poppy upbeat song that weaves in and out of dynamics with a drum kit and harmonious melodies that seem to get stuck in your head. “Magnet,” though written by the Punch Brothers, has a Beck-like feel, with reverb-heavy vocals and modern-pop drums. “Boll Weevil” is a traditional song transformed by the signature Punch Brothers spin, and it’s definitely the most bluegrassy track on the album. Though it’s only 2½ minutes long, it allows each instrument to stretch out on the melody. The love song “Little Lights” closes things out with a somber feel.

If you are a fan of the Punch Brothers’ previous forward-leaning, youthful acoustic music, you should like this album. If you haven’t yet had a taste, I recommend just pushing play and opening up to their excellent musicianship.