“Here Come Feller & Hill Again” by Feller & Hill

Feller & Hill
Here Come Feller & Hill Again
Blue Circle Records
4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Bluegrass is both narrow and broad. It’s narrow because stepping outside the accepted six instruments causes queasiness in a lot of people. Steel guitar? Uh…maybe. Just don’t bring it on stage. Piano? Okay if it’s Buck White but keep the volume low. Drums? Whew, boy, bluegrass is going rock ‘n’ roll. The reaction to including country songs is usually less acidic, and you hear southern gospel, blues, old timey and rock songs.

On this new CD Tom Feller and Chris Hill push the bluegrass envelope a bit with a steel guitar (Hill, who also plays banjo, guitar and adds vocals) and drums (Feller, who adds guitar, mandolin, bass, Dobro on “The Government Blues” and vocals), but they aren’t straying too far from the bluegrass formula.

“Hey Baby” isn’t Bill Monroe traditional but it is from the pen of Aubrey Holt (Boys From Indiana, Feller’s uncle). Holt also wrote “Here Comes Polly,” a good bluegrass number that features Cody Jones singing bass. Keeping it in the family, Feller’s mother, Judy, contributes “Stone Woman Blues.” This is a good number in the classic country vein and features the great Michael Cleveland (another southern Indiana boy) on fiddles. Cleveland plays fiddle on most tracks with Glenn Gibson playing Dobro.

This underlines an important feature of their music—it’s aimed at the bluegrass market (a more viable market than classic country) and is well accepted by the bluegrass crowd (the Bean Blossom watchers were very enthusiastic), but it tends to be more classic country than bluegrass. This is acoustic country music, so it fits in a bluegrass environment, though no doubt those with purist leanings would complain. I had a chance to talk with Chris Hill and he tells me that their selection of classic country music is intentional, an aim for a niche market that isn’t being explored in depth by other bluegrass artists. Instead of bluegrass with an occasional country song, they are doing classic country in a bluegrass/acoustic format and their next CD, on the final production laps, will be a country CD with no pretensions of bluegrass music.

Tom T and Dixie Hall have written many good songs for bluegrass and they add two here. “The Government Blues” is a fine number that would have fit Jimmy Rodgers well, relating the many woes of taxes and no money. “Tired of Losing You,” with Rhonda Vincent adding vocals (co-written with Billy Smith), is a great country love song. This is the only number that you’ll hear Chris Hill’s steel work but it blends well and is not at all over the top. Another famous name from country music is Faron Young, who composed “Forget The Past.” Feller & Hill underscore the resemblance they bear to Buck Owens and Don Rich but on this number Hill has styling closer to Faron Young’s.

Speaking of Owens and Rich, Feller wrote a number in honor of their memory and includes bits of several of their hits in it. “The Ballad of Buck and Don” is tribute to one of the best duets in the history of country music.

They nod to gospel music with a Joyce “Dottie” Rambo song, “When Is He Coming Again.” It’s a story of fighting betwwen families and when will Jesus come again to relieve us of all the darkness of the world. Heather Berry-Mabe adds vocals to this track. They turn to bluegrass tradition with a Don Reno number, “He’s Coming Back To Earth Again,” singing it it the echoing style of Reno & Smiley.

“It’ll Be Too Late” is another good country song while “Never Ending Song of Love” will be familiar to many. Made popular by Delaney & Bonnie, whose members at times included Duane Allman and Gregg Allman, George Harrison, Leon Russell, Rita Coolidge and Eric Clapton, it was also recorded by George Jones and Tammy Wynette. This is the only track with drums. I asked Hill why they included drums and he told me the track seemed to be missing something and adding the drums tied it all together. But the wildest selection is “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue,” a Richard Rogers number recorded by such diverse groups as The Ventures and The London Festival Orchestra, though you’ll have a hard time hearing Feller & Hill’s version in the orchestral recording. Crazy as the idea may sound, this makes a good instrumental for a bluegrass band.

If you like country mixed with bluegrass you’ll thoroughly enjoy this up-and-coming duo.

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“Down on the Farm” by the Stevens Family Bluegrass Band

The Stevens Family Bluegrass Band
Down On The Farm
Mountain Fever Records
4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Family bands—parents and kids—often must suffer comparison to the Cherryholmes clan since their remarkable success. The Stevens Family Band is the Cherryholmes meets Duck Dynasty. When they’re at home JW (the dad) enjoys coon hunting (a favorite of Jimmy Martin and myself) and running his trapline with Luke, number seven of ten children. Four (Sissy, 1974), seven (Luke), eight? (Ben, 1983), nine (Sam, 1990) and ten (Tommy, 1997) join Dad and Mom (Nancy) to make up the band.

Given that JW Stevens is a minister it’s not surprising that the CD is heavy with spiritual songs. “City of Gold” (Nancy Stevens singing lead) is a good, upbeat gospel number. The vocalists are all good (Sissy and Luke Stevens singing harmony) and it’s a good arrangement. She also sings lead on “How Great Thou Art,” done a cappella, showing their strong harmony singing with children Luke, Sissy and Ben joining in, though Ben struggles a bit with the lower registers of the bass part. Her other lead number is shown here as “Search The Book” by Jerry Golf (actual title, “Please Search the Book Again” by Jerry Goff) and it’s a great gospel number. They include a drop to a minor as a transition from the 1 chord to the 4 chord and it’s a perfect touch. You can hear different arrangements on the web and this is the best I’ve heard.

JW Stevens sings lead on one number with Nancy singing harmony. “Old Fashion Love” is secular, a description (in their own words) of their relationship. This makes a beautiful love song.

The title song was penned by Sissy Stevens and is a picture of the family. Songs like this often fail because the lyrics or melody just can’t make the grade—too cute, too simplistic, too focused on the writer—but this is a vary good number and should have wide appeal to other bands looking for a good song. Brother Luke penned “She’s The One,” a story about being on the road and leaving loved ones behind. It’s a good, hard driving number and is especially interesting because it’s a display of the instrumental abilities of the band. They tend to be laid back on most of their numbers, providing good support but no sparkling breaks. This track leaves no doubts about them as pickers.

“A Living Prayer” (Ron Block) is a powerful gospel number and Sissy, Luke and Ben provide powerful harmony to drive it. The late Randall Hylton wrote “Where Rainbows Touch Down,” an illustration of his songwriting abilities and yet another beautiful harmony number.

This is a CD that may get overlooked in a crowded marketplace but it is definitely worth a listen. You’ll be glad you took the time.

“Taproot” by Three Tall Pines

Taproot
Three Tall Pines
self-released
3½ stars (out of 5)

By Aaron Keith Harris

Taproot is a six-song, 23-minute EP, the third studio effort from New England bluegrass/Americana quartet Three Tall Pines.

Dan Bourdeau (guitar, vocals), Nick DiSebastian (bass, guitar, vocals), Joe Lurgio (mandolin, vocals), and Conor Smith (fiddle, vocals) are joined by guest banjo picker and producer Ron Cody on five bluegrass standards and one fine Bourdeau original—the decidedly Welchian “Stonewalls.”

TTP won’t be mistaken—especially vocally—for most of the bluegrass bands that include “Walls of Time,” “Crying Holy,” and “Angel Band” in their repetoire, and that’s a good thing. Their arrangments have a hint of the rock/jam band sound to them, getting the right mix of reverent and refreshing.

Smith’s playing throughout is especially good, and he’s joined on two tracks by a couple of fellow fiddlers to great effect: Britanny Haas on a soaring “Raleigh & Spencer” and by Haas and Lauren Rioux on “With Body & Soul.”

This was my first notice of TTP, and I’ll be looking forward to more material, especially original compostions as good as the lone example here.

“Let it Go” by the Infamous Stringdusters

The Infamous Stringdusters
Let it Go
High Country Recordings
5 stars (out of 5)

By Aaron Keith Harris

The bass player usually is mentioned last, but Travis Book’s work is what makes this fifth studio album by the Infamous Stringdusters one of the very best acoustic albums that I’ve heard in a while.

So many bands attempting to transcend their nominal bluegrass origins go bashing away as hard and fast as they can, leaving drive and direction out of it altogether. The most readily apparent sign of this is usually bassist who can’t quite keep up. Then you have players like Book (as well as the great Mike Bub) who are the lead dogs, giving those closer to the sled more room to work.

The 11-track, 40-minute Let it Go is the work of a band that seems to play, sing, and even think, as one. So much so that the CD packaging doesn’t identify the band members, much less give a track by track accounting of who’s playing and singing what, as is customary on many bluegrass releases, especially the ones with hired studio aces.

The complete sound is what the Stringdusters are concerned with and the sound they make here has the drive of a band like Blue Highway—with brighter, more melodic textures—backed by musicianship about as good as the Punch Brothers without the pretentious wankery.

The instrumental breaks are short and collaborative, with the Dobro or fiddle often running in one channel the same quick zigs and zags as the banjo in the opposite. The guitar adds depth to Book’s bass, and occasionally steps out for some crisp and rich flatpicked solos.

And all of this is done in support of some great singing and songwriting—I’ve been listening constantly to “I’ll Get Away,” “Where the River Runs Cold,” and “Summercamp” the last couple of weeks, whether through speakers, headphones, or just my mind.

“Summercamp” is a three-and-a-half-minute masterpiece that sounds like what you would get if you locked Ron Sexsmith and the mid-1970s Seldom Scene in the studio and told them they couldn’t come out until they had a radio hit.

As we’re beginning summer in our hemisphere, I couldn’t recommend more highly a new album to add to your musical rotation for the sunny days ahead.

“Silver Ladder” by Peter Mulvey

Peter Mulvey
Silver Ladder
Signature Sounds
4 stars (out of 5)

By Donald Teplyske

Admittedly, I’ve not been as familiar or as enamoured with Peter Mulvey as I am others of his lonely-folk ilk.

I find that what appeals to any individual listener is the personal connection one has made with an artist. For every John Wort Hannam, Dar Willians, Martyn Joseph, or Mark Erelli that I’ve related to, there are a hundred others with whom—usually through no fault of their own—I’ve failed to align.

To my ears, there has been little to distinguish Mulvey from the hordes of ‘sages on stages’ making their living performing songs in coffee shops and folk clubs across North America.

Although I’ve purchased one of his albums—2007’s acoustic envisioning of his catalogue, Notes from Elsewhereand heard a couple others—including the very impressive Boston subway covers album Ten Thousand MorningsI’ve never connected with his music on an ongoing basis.

I’ve enjoyed his albums while they were playing, but I don’t recall ever going to the shelf and thinking, “I need me some Mulvey.” Maybe it would be different had I experienced a concert, but I haven’t, or if I spent time in Milwaukee, which I don’t.

All that changes now with Silver Ladder. Maybe it was the whimsical cover art. It could have been seeing Chuck Prophet listed as producer. Perhaps it was that the album was assigned to me for review and so I was forced to listen to it a bit more judiciously than I might have otherwise.

But, I think this is what it was that pulled me in: I never realized how much Mulvey shared—in cadence, outlook, and themes—with Phil Lynott’s spoken blues, rock poet stylings and on a pair of tracks here (“What Else Was It?” and “Copenhagen Airport”), Mulvey could be giving voice to long-forgotten demos from Solo in Soho or an unreleased Thin Lizzy album. Continuing the classic rock allusion, I could hear Ian Hunter singing “Sympathies” and “Remember the Milkman?”

Maybe I’m the only one who hears it. That’s okay.

Whatever it was that got me here, I’m glad it did. Turns out Silver Linings—released in a year of amazing Americana recordings from the likes of Rosanne Cash, Eliza Gilkyson, Jeff Black, and Laurie Lewis—stands with the best of them.

“And I’ll greet all the good people

With my head held high and my wide open hand

And I’ll wait for you down by the willow

But just once a year”

is just one of the discordant sets of lyrics populating these songs, those from “Josephine,” one of the album’s most striking moments.

“You Don’t Have To Tell Me” and “Back to the Wind” are free-wheeling rockers buoyed by considerable wordsmithery:

“In the middle of a lifetime the road gets a little squirrelly

You might lost your sense of humor for a year or two.”

Like the best songwriters, Mulvey doesn’t allow smugness to weed his garden of words. While clearly betrayed by “Lies You Forgot You Told,” his anger is tempered by a realization that he is not without fault. Still, “with any kind of luck by now, it will be falling on your head tenfold” allows hope for the cynic.

Silver Ladder is a deep, unified album. While the songs certainly stand up to isolated listening, it feels as if it should be experienced as a whole. The songs aren’t so much thematically linked as they are elements of a common fabric. The verbosity of “If You Shoot at a King You Must Kill Him” is balanced by the lyrical brevity of “Copenhagen Airport” and “Landfall.” The opening “Lies You Forgot You Told” naturally and ideally flows into “You Don’t Have To Tell Me.”

The core band—Mulvey (guitar), Prophet (guitar, drums), Aiden Hawken (keys, guitar), James DePrato (guitars), David Kemper (drums) and Tom Freund (bass)—is augmented by others including the wondrous vocals of Anita Suhanin (“Where Did You Go?” and heard on previous Mulvey recordings), and the equally impressive Sara Watkins (vocally on “Remember the Milkman?”, violin on “Landfall.”)

In my opinion, Peter Mulvey’s Silver Ladder is a roots rock album of the highest order.

“Memory of a Mountain” by Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers

Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers
Memory Of a Mountain
self-released

3½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

The Lady Slippers are unusual (but not unique) as an all-female bluegrass band. They’re from Cincinnati and have a solid regional reputation. A look at their upcoming events shows them working in Ohio and several surrounding states. The biographical information for the members (Ma Crow, Trina Emig, Margie Drees, Vicki Abbott) lists a number of bands they’ve performed in (Chicken Deluxe, Jennie Lyn Band, Dr. Twang and the Stainless Steel) but you may not recognize the names.

They describe their music as bluegrass/American/mountain, and it indeed sounds like some combination of bluegrass and old-timey. Drees penned three of the numbers. “Liberty Hill” is a song about trying to find liberty from oppression and fits the bluegrass mold. Ma Crow sings lead on all the vocal tracks and here she’s joined by Drees singing harmony. Their playing is good as are the harmonies. The title song has a very pretty melody and tells a sad story of the Appalachians: mining has destroyed many mountains and this is a story of memories before mining took away the beauty. Emig has a melodic banjo break that will catch your attention. Staying with the mountain theme, the third Drees number is “Daughter of the Mountain” and is more-or-less the story of Ma Crow’s mother, Nadine. All good tracks, very close to classical bluegrass with a touch of old-time feeling.

Ma Crow as a lead singer fares well but, as always, personal taste has to be considered. Her singing voice is much closer to Hazel Dickens than to the standard crop of modern bluegrass female vocalists. Production qualities are good, not surprising since the CD was mixed and mastered by Ron Stewart. Stewart, a good singer with a husky, smoker’s voice, makes a gigantic vocal contribution by adding a couple of grunts during “Get Up John.” Emig plays a good mandolin on this number and Drees plays fiddle. The fiddle playing is adequate but won’t blow you away.

“Shady Grove” and “Ages and Ages Ago” are familiar numbers. “Time Is Winding Up” is a public domain gospel number presented in an old-time, unadorned way that you might not recognize if you’ve heard Helen Millers version. I’ll stick with the acoustic version. “Going To The West” is another old number and features some of their best harmony singing, and they have a good presentation of “Montana Cowboy,” done by Emmylou Harris as “Montana Cowgirl.”

The one song that simply loses me is “No Mermaid.” This is a Sinéad Lohan song, covered by Joan Baez and sounds out of place in this album setting.

The picking is good, though none of it will blow away your toupee. The singing is all good as long as you like this style of unadorned melody. Given the status Hazel Dickens in this music, a lot of people do. It’s worth a listen.

 

“Randy Cook & Commonwealth Bluegrass Band” by Randy Cook & Commonwealth Bluegrass Band

Randy Cook & Commonwealth Bluegrass Band
Randy Cook & Commonwealth Bluegrass Band
Pulley Tunes
3½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

A lot of good music is made in bluegrass by bands that don’t have national recognition. Listen to Commonwealth Bluegrass on “Dry Run Creek,” a number best identified with the Seldom Scene’s 1995 Dream Scene album. They get it right, with an eerie feel by playing it in a minor chord and the high tenor’s slide up on the bridge. They do a good job on “Ashes of Love,” the old Johnnie & Jack song that’s been recorded and sung so many times the words are worn out. Randy Cook sings on-key and keeps time and that’s the basic requirements for bluegrass and country, and on-key isn’t always accomplished by artists. (That’s not a dig at bluegrass and country singers. Jim Nabors has great technical vocal abilities but I can’t hear him doing “Dark Hollow.”)

The numbers written by banjo player Malcolm Pulley are good bluegrass, a bit in the Jimmy Martin do-it-simple vein. “Living In The Country” is a description of life in the country, from watermelon to corn likker. Mike Sharp has a great Dobro break on this track. “Wearing My Heart Out On My Sleeve,” featuring fiddle by Ron Stewart, is a love song that Martin might have sung. The lyrics don’t challenge your imagination much as they strive to rhyme but it’s bluegrass that the crowds will enjoy. Pulley has some very good banjo breaks scattered throughout the CD.

Lance Seal is a competent bass players but he’s playing a stick bass (based on one of their videos) and you can make those sound like a Fender or a Kay. His sounds like a Fender. I’m not a purist but I don’t like the Fender sound in bluegrass. Jason Owen does good guitar work on “The Door Is Always Open,” the Dave & Sugar song that went to #1 on the country charts. This is yet another country song that plays well in bluegrass. Waylon Jennings put the song out in 1975 but his release of “Rose In Paradise” was several degrees more popular and Commonwealth Bluegrass has a good version on this CD. Either in the studio or the mix they should have done some filtering on this song as the S’s are sibilant, but it’s still enjoyable and a good arrangement.

Guitarist Jason Owen penned “He Wants To Be A Daddy Now,” a touching song about a man who abandoned his daughter then later has a change of heart. If you like broken love songs you’ll like “Getting Over You,” or perhaps a number that’s traditional like “Molly Rose” written by Lynnwood Lunsford, and if you’ve never heard “Purple Valley Blues” you’re in for a treat.