"Nashville" by the Osborne Brothers

The Osborne Brothers
Nashville
Pinecastle Records
4 stars (out of 5)

By Aaron Keith Harris

Give the folks at the resurgent Pinecastle Records credit for issuing this fourth and final chapter in an ambitious Osborne Brothers career retrospective—begun in 1998—in spite of many obstacles, most notably Sonny’s retirement.

The three previous installments—Hyden (1998), Dayton to Knoxville (2000), and Detroit to Wheeling (2003)— were mostly new recordings of Osborne classic tracks associated with different segments of their career, and Nashville seems to have been planned as a similar revival, this time of their most commercially successful period as veteran Grand Ole Opry stars who grabbed lots of country airplay in the late ‘60s and through the ‘70s after adding steel guitar, drums, and electric bass to Sonny’s unique banjo picking and Bobby’s soaring lead singing.

Instead, Nashville brings to light seven lost recordings from a album abandoned by the group when they abruptly, and unhappily, left MCA Records, which had appropriated their previous label, Decca. Cut in Bradley’s Barn in 1973 (which I think is correct, though in one place, the liner says 1975) with studio pros including Vassar Clements (fiddle), Pig Robbins (piano), and Hall Rugg (steel and Dobro), it’s pretty stout stuff.

The Bobby composition “Gonna Be Raining When I Die” surely would have been a radio hit that year, and Phil Rosenthal’s “Muddy Waters,” cut by the Seldom Scene the same year, shows just how sophisticated the brothers from Hyden, Ky. could be.

With two killer Louvin tracks (“My Baby’s Gone” and “When I Stop Dreaming”) and three from the pen of Jake Landers (“The Oak Tree,” “Going Back to the Mountains,” and “The Hard Times”), they were clearly in the home stretch of a project that would have stood with their best.

Quite satisfying that we finally have them here—along with an eighth track, Roger Miller’s “Half a Mind” from a strictly acoustic 1995 session that features Terry Eldredge joining the vocal trio and Gene Wooten’s Dobro trading licks with Sonny’s crisp and woody guitjo.