"In Style Again" by Jim Ed Brown

Jim Ed Brown
In Style Again
Plowboy
Records
4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

In 1959 I was a kid with a lot of exposure to country music because that was the music—really the only music—my dad loved. But it was at grandma’s house that I first heard “The Three Bells.” I was mesmerized, drawn to the smooth baritone of Jim Ed Brown. For the next fifty-six years he’s remained one of my favorite singers. He, as well as his many contemporaries, disappeared from mainstream “country” radio years ago. But they persevered, still playing dates, maybe moving to Branson, still playing the Opry. And now Jim Ed Brown has a new CD.

“Who gave the world the right to turn the page, and leave me here feeling twice my age?” The title song asks this and many of us feel that way as the decades roll along, but it’s a question that Brown can certainly ask as he saw his career fade from the spotlight. It’s not that his fans don’t still love him, but his fans are feeling the touch of age and the crowds that follow stars like Garth Brooks or Luke Bryan far outnumber the crowds around country stars from the music’s golden era. It’s an introspective question, not maudlin, and it makes a touching song. He’d just like to be “In Style Again.” He’s joined by sister Bonnie on a beautiful number, “When The Sun Says Hello To The Mountain.” Chris Scruggs’ pedal steel underscores this song with a classic melody. And speaking of classic melodies, his longtime singing partner Helen Cornelius joins him on Carl and Pearl Butler‘s “Don’t Let Me Cross Over.”

“Laura (Do You Love Me)” is an easy-flowing love song of a love lost because he’s out traveling the world. There’s a hint of an Irish air in it but it’s truly a country ballad. Brown, who will turn 81 on April 1, 2015, still has that beautiful baritone but his voice shows a few signs of age. At times you can now hear some gravel in his voice as you do on this number, sometimes he has some trouble hitting the notes. There was recent news that he returned to the Grand Ole Opry after a four-months absence being treated for lung cancer. That may have affected his singing some during this recording but, if you can reduce it to numbers, his voice is still 95 percent as good as ever. “Tried and True” is a country number that will take your breath away if you’re a fan of the ’60s sound with a walking bass line. Vince Gill sings backup on this one.

“It’s A Good Life” is the story of a life lived as best a man could while “Older Guy” is a put-down of young guys is favor of the wisdom of age. It has a swing sound that you’ll enjoy, almost inviting you to dance even if you have two left feet. Sharon and Cheryl White join him on “You Again,” another song that looks back across the years but he’ll still choose the love of his life again. “Watching the World Walking By” is another swing song that has a happy note to it.

The backup musicians and singers are all excellent, the arrangements all good. There’s some variety in song styles and my preference would be a narrower focus, more on his ’60s and early ’70s music, but that’s my own prejudice and this selection will probably appeal to a wider range of folks. One of his songs asks, “Am I Still Country?” It has some really good lines comparing a meat loaf boy to a Chinese-food man, but he concludes he’s still country. There’s not much country in country music these days, but Jim Ed Brown’s got it and he’s still country.