“Don’t Forget Me Little Darling” by Antique Persuasion

Antique Persuasion
Don’t Forget Me Little Darling
Voxhall Records
5 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

You simply cant count the country and bluegrass musicians who list the Carter Family as an influence in their music. Just as Bill Monroe became known as the father of bluegrass, despite a number of notable stars who contributed to that birth, the Carter Family have a place in history as the parents of country music. They were not the only people making music like that back then but they have stood the test of time as one of the foremost groups at the birth of this music we love.

A.P. Carter, his wife Sara, and her cousin and his sister–in–law, Maybelle, captured the imagination of the common folk at a time when life was hard for them. The Carter Family first recorded in Bristol, Tennessee in what we now view as primitive conditions. They were interested in making a few dollars, never dreaming what they would start that day. “Bury Me Beneath The Weeping Willow” is the left bookend of the Carter Family’s recording history and this CD. This song has been recorded countless times in bluegrass, country and western (cowboy) settings. The Carter Family versions of all these numbers have a different feel than this recording, in part because of the instrumentation—usually only a guitar, partly because of advances in recording technology and partly because of technique. The Carters’ singing was straightforward, unadorned, even a bit strident. Some, perhaps many of the fans of bluegrass and classic country today wouldn’t listen long to a Carter Family recording.

The CD cover credits A.P. Carter as the composer of all but one of these songs. Take that with a grain of salt. While his name may appear on official credits, many of the Carter Family songs are adaptations of songs that pre–date them by decades if not centuries. “Bury Me Beneath The Weeping Willow” was the subject of a 1970 conversation with Maybelle Carter as reported on grassclippings. “That was a song we had sang all our lives. [Read the center section on the website.] The original version of the song was written by Bradley Kincaid.” Another conversation relates, “Other sources suggest the song’s older, a late–19th–century ‘heart song’ that Kincaid adopted; apparently a sheet music version dates to a year when he was 14 years old, making his authorship unlikely.” None of this affects the contribution of the Carter Family nor the beauty of this new CD, but it’s always good to have a hint of the actual history of the songs.

My wife, a fringe fan of bluegrass (as I’ve reported before) was listening to this CD as we drove and she described it as “soothing.” I know she would never say the same about the original version. Have no doubt, though, Antique Persuasion honors the Carter Family music, just giving it a 2015 interpretation. The last song recorded by the Carters, and the only one here not “written” by A. P. Carter (it was composed—or adapted—by Maybelle Carter), was “ You’re Gonna Be Sorry Cause You Let Me Down.” (CF version) Brandon Rickman sings lead and plays guitar and mandolin. He’s a good one to be singing these traditional songs because he has a voice that speaks bluegrass to me. Not that there isn’t room for other types of singers, such as the high, lonesome sound of Monroe or the balladeer’s voice of David Parmley. But I especially enjoy singers like Rickman. It’s in the tone and inflection, his phrasing. Like bluegrass, you know it when you hear it. You can hear Rickman’s voice often because he’s the lead singer for the Lonesome River Band.

He’s joined by Jenee Fleenor. She’s made other appearances in bluegrass but her primary job is backing Blake Shelton (vocals, fiddle, mandolin, guitar). Brennan Leigh, a great singer from Austin, Texas, rounds out the group, offering vocals and guitar. Mark Fain makes a guest appearance on upright bass. Warning! There’s no banjo present but, to be fair, the Carter Family didn’t use one, either.

Rickman also sings lead on “Lover’s Lane” (familiar from Red Smiley & the Bluegrass Cutups) and “Lover’s Return” ( familiar from Emmylou Harris, Linda Ronstatdt & Dolly Parton).

“Dark and Stormy Weather” is a departure from the straightforward nature of most of the songs. Sung in minors, it’s dark and moody. Sung by Fleenor, there are no background vocals and only Fleenor’s fiddle and guitar and Fain’s arco bass. It’s moodier than Helen Carter’s version which is also a takeoff of the original. She also sings lead on “When Silver Threads Are Gold,” a lighter–hearted song about love. “Lonesome For You” is done as western swing and is a familiar number to any fan. The original version had this same feel but in a more primitive fashion. Fleenor trades leads with Rickman and you’ll hear great harmony singing, on this and all other songs except “Dark and Stormy Weather” and Fleenor’s other lead number, “I’m Thinking Of My Blue Eyes.” Again it’s just Fleenor and Fain with an arrangement that gets away from the Carter Family (and usual) styling, but is beautifully done, giving a fresh take on this familiar song.

Leigh sings lead on “Broken Hearted Lover” (not to be confused with the Delmore Brothers/IIIrd Tyme Out song of the same name). You’ll note Fleenor’s fiddle providing support on this song, smooth, melodic, and relaxing (to use my wife’s description). She also sings lead on “Don’t Forget Me Little Darling,” “Hello Stranger” (recorded by Emmylou Harris and Hazel Dickens/Alice Gerrard) and the only gospel number, “On the Sea of Galilee.”

This is an excellent window into the Carter Family’ great body of work. Great singing by the three members of Antique Persuasion, excellent instrumental work, great arrangements. If you like bluegrass, don’t miss this one.

“When I’m Free” by Hot Rize

Hot Rize
When I’m Free
Ten In Hand Records

4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Hot Rize is a deservedly iconic band, beloved for their take on bluegrass music, their rambling discourses during a show, and for their alternate egos, Red Knuckles and the Trailblazers. I saw them last year and it was 50 percent talk, 50 percent music. But, a CD is all music and they waited almost twenty-five years to do another studio album. It’s done well, in the top ten on the chart and three songs in the top 20 at one time. (The August 7 chart (Bluegrass Today) shows only “Clary Mae” still there, making a rapid fall from #2 to #19 in two weeks. The Roots Music Report, on the other hand, shows the CD at #6, down from #1 last week.)

“Clary Mae” is a good bluegrass number, rolling along supported by Pete “Dr. Banjo” Wernick’s renowned banjo playing. Wernick founded the group in the 1970s with Tim O’Brien, Nick Forster, and the late Charles Sawtelle. They have a lot of life left for a group that stopped touring in 1990, making only a few appearances until reformong as a band after all these years, Sawtelle’s spot being filled by Bryan Sutton. It does seem that they are back on the road again, making something of a comeback which has complicated things for O’Brien. He was a part of the Earls of Leicester and is having to mostly step away from that group to commit more time to Hot Rize. I suppose there are worse dilemmas.

“Doggone” is on the rockabilly side with good harmony singing, a rocking medium tempo song. “Blue is Fallin'” is a song about some hard times and features a nice guitar break by Sutton. “Western Skies” is all about wanting to get back to western skies and features Wernick’s banjo in the driver’s seat. Like the individual members of the group, whose careers have prospered through the years but not always in the bluegrass genre, these songs are on the fringe around the core bluegrass sound of Monroe, but are greatly enjoyed by bluegrass fans.

They show their gospel side with “I Am The Road,” a song with the drive of a bulldozer—neither hot nor fast, it’s  a relentless force telling a message of faith. It isn’t told in the usual words of God and faith, but the message is there.

I am the road, I am the way

Many walk down and many will stray

Straight and narrow, far and wide

You won’t be lonesome while side by side

The track that’s named like a gospel number, “Glory in The Meeting House,” is actually an instrumental, Irish-sounding jig, light-hearted with an old-time feel. “Sky Rider” is another instrumental, featuring syncopated banjo by Wernick. Sutton is always there supporting the band with his excellent guitar playing—especially on several breaks in “You Were On My Mind This Morning.” He made his first big splash in bluegrass as a member of Kentucky Thunder and went on to become famous as a session player and touring with artists like Béla Fleck and Jerry Douglas. Following Charles Sawtelle’s death in 1999, the band re-grouped in 2002 and invited Sutton into the fold.

“A Cowboy’s Life” is not very grassy except for the banjo, but a great story song and a nice change of pace. Another on-the-bluegrass-fringe cit is “I Never Met a One Like You,” on which one of the group’s career-spanning signature traits— Nick Forster’s clean, understated bass guitar—can be appreciated.

“Run Away Tonight” by Chris Jones & the Night Drivers

Chris Jones & the Night Drivers
Run Away Tonight
Mountain Home Music Company

4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Chris Jones & the Night Drivers are earning a reputation as one of the top bands in bluegrass. Their music reflects strong ties to traditional bluegrass and they rely heavily on the band members’ talents as songwriters. Three of the four-man band regularly appear on SiriusXM’s Bluegrass Bunction (Jones, Weisberger and Luberecki).

Chris Jones plays guitar and does the lead singing. His distinctive voice is pitched lower than standard for bluegrass music, and is more a balladeer than his peers. It’s an easy voice to listen to and doesn’t take the adjustment needed by fringe bluegrass fans to some of the more traditional voices and stylings (such as Danny Paisley). Jon Weisberger plays bass and sings baritone and also adds to the mix his talent as a composer. Jones and Weisberger wrote “She’s Just About To Say Goodbye,” which features the fiddle of Troy Engle and harmony vocals of Darin and Brooke Aldridge. This is a good, country-style love song with an interesting arrangement.

The pair also wrote “Laurie,” an uptempo bluegrass number with Ned Luberecki providing a banjo break, Jones showing his skill on lead guitar and former Night Driver Casey Driessen playing fiddle. Their third number is “One Night in Paducah,” featuring Buddy Melton singing tenor and Tim Surrett playing Dobro. Bandmember Mark Stoffel provides an interesting mandolin break on this haunting song about love gone wrong in eerie circumstances. Jones had a hand in some of the other cuts, such as “My Portion and My Cup,” co-written with Donna Ulisse and featuring the Aldridges singing harmony. This is the only gospel number on the CD. Jones went solo on composing with “Dust Off the Pain,” another suffering from heartbreak song (bluegrassers do a lot of suffering) and “Tonight I’m Gonna Ride,” a high speed number with Driessen playing fiddle.

Going back a bunch of years they cover a Flatt & Scruggs number, “Thinking About You.” This cut features Del McCoury singing tenor and Bobby Hicks playing fiddle. It’s tough to get more traditional than this and it’s a good song from those early masters of bluegrass. They also have a Tom T Hall number, “Pinto the Wonder Horse Is Dead.” It may not be bluegrass, but it’s a great story song from the master of story songs. It takes me back many years to memories just like these. They stay true to Hall’s 1971 version. Switching gears, they include an old-time/Gaelic number, “The Leaving of Liverpool,” done by groups like the Dubliners. Strictly speaking, this isn’t bluegrass either, but a first cousin, much closer than the country-pop some bluegrass groups are including in their CDs.

Night Driver mandolinist Mark Stoffel composed “Shelby 8,” a very good instrumental with some minor chords and an interesting progression. There’s some excellent picking in this one. Ned Luberecki adds a banjo number, “Bowties Are Cool” which raises the oft-asked question (at least by me), how do they come up with these titles?

This CD solidifies the Night Drivers spot in the pack of leading bluegrass groups. It’s a good buy.

 

“Never Just a Song” by Shannon and Heather Slaughter

Shannon and Heather Slaughter
Never Just a Song
Elite Circle Music

4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Shannon and Heather Slaughter continue to make good music. I was impressed with One More Road and they keep the bar high again. One change appears to be appearing without a full-time band. The County Clare website is defunct and no mention of the band is made on their website or CD cover. They have made good use of some well known names in bluegrass to back them, including Ron Stewart (fiddle on all tracks but one) and Tim Crouch (triple fiddles on “Whiskey Colored Dreams”), Randy Kohrs (resophonic guitar), Trevor Watson and Justin Jenkins sharing banjo duties, and former County Clare bandmate Ron Inscore adding mandolin.

“Moonshiner,” a fast-moving song about the life of a moonshiner, is a good bluegrass number but might have been best performed by Shannon rather than Heather Slaughter. It’s not that she lacks anything in the singing category, but, in this case, I think his voice fits this song’s imagery better. The title number was composed by Tim Stafford and Pam Tillis as a tribute to the late Harley Allen, describing his genius and his foibles. They switch to traditional country with “Whiskey Colored Dreams,” a number co-written by Heather that has Doug Jernigan on steel guitar and Tracey Burcham on bass plus Crouch playing fiddles. The song features good harmony singing and should have been a Top Ten song forty years ago; it makes that grade here.

Their former bass player, Cliff Bailey, penned “Go Sin No More.” This is top-class bluegrass gospel and features great fiddling by Ron Stewart. Shannon co-wrote the lightning fast “Ridin’ the Lighnin’, Ropin’ the Storm” with Dale Felts, a sequel to a 2006 number they wrote (“Whoop and Ride”) that was recorded by the Lonesome River Band. This is one of those songs that gets a crowd into the show. The songs range from a tribute to our country (“That’s What’s Good In America”) to a tribute to the men who work Appalachia’s mines (“Company Town”) with a touch of heartstrings thrown in (“The Best Thing We Ever Did,” a tribute to their daughter, Rae Carroll Slaughter). Shannon S. teamed with veteran songwriter Bill Castle to write the traditional sounds of “There Ain’t No Need To Be Lonely” and then turns to Hank Williams, Jr. for “Feelin’ Better.”

The Slaughters are both capable lead singers and their supporting artists add good harmony singing and excellent picking. Good arrangements of good songs—this is good bluegrass.

“Heartstrings” by the Trinity River Band

The Trinity River Band
Heartstrings
Orange Blossom Records

4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

We last visited the music of the Trinity River Band a few months ago in February. I said then, “This is a family band and yet another family loaded with talent.”

They set the bar high with Better Than Blue and it hasn’t dropped a bit with this new CD. Love songs are a staple in bluegrass and country music and “Fences” is one of the prettiest you’ll ever hear. This a duet featuring Sarah Harris and guest Marty Raybon. It starts with an intro by Joshua Harris playing resophonic guitar (he’s also the banjoist). Brianna Harris adds fiddle and the effect is nothing short of spectacular. Another one that will grab your attention is a rocking but bluesy rendition of “How Blue,” a Reba McEntire hit. Mike Harris (Dad) gives a good flattop intro that sets the pace and feel for the song.

Sarah Harris is featured on mandolin on “Blue Mandolin,” a song dealing with love problems. The song was composed by the late, great Leroy Drumm, well know for co-writing with Pete Gobel as well as Stacy Richardson who, along with Andy Richardson, co-wrote this number. The family ventures into the Irish with the traditional “Where Are You Tonight, I Wonder.” It’s not Flatt & Scruggs but it’s a beautiful song that anyone with some tenderness still left beneath the crust will enjoy.

A recent complaint on the bluegrass listserv was too many of the current crop of songs are poorly written. They have sentences instead of lyrics. I’ve heard some of these, no more interesting than the Gettysburg Address set to music. Not so with the numbers composed by family members here. “You Can’t Walk All Over Me“ was written by Sarah and Mike Harris and Mike composed the title song, a statement of the goals of the family for their music. Joshua Harris shows off his banjo skills on his composition, “Mindbender.” This cut gives you a good chance to hear Lisa Harris’ (Mom) bass playing which is often understated. These people are excellent musicians as well as singers. This is not a CD that leaves you wondering where to pigeonhole it. Let’s see, Americana? Roots? GuessGrass? This is bluegrass music.

Other numbers are “Rusty Old American Dream,” the voice of an old, gas guzzler car (Joshua Harris), asking for one last chance to cruise the country. “Only Here For a Little While” was Billy Dean’s hit from his 1990 debut and the Harris family, with Mike Harris singing lead, nails it. Brink Brinkman contributes a second song in their gospel number, “Give God The Power,” a good message for us all. The lead vocals are split between the sisters

Larry Cordle is represented (as co-writer) by “Going Down Hard.” As much as I like Joshua Harris’ hard–driving banjo, I believe I like his resophonic guitar work even better. On songs of pain like this one, or songs of love, his playing is restrained and thoughtful. Cordle has had a hand in some great songs and this is another one. Mark Johnson guests on clawgrass banjo on an Anne & Pete Sibley number, “Tell Me Darlin.” The original version is lovely but I prefer the richer harmony of the Harris version.

This is fine music. They seem to be in the business for the long haul and they have the talent to make it.

“Old Pal” by Jamie Harper

Jamie Harper
Old Pal
Mountain Fever Records

4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Jamie Harper is a fine, young fiddler out on the road with Junior Sisk and Ramblers Choice. He’s spent time—recording, touring, and filling in—with several good bands, including Michelle Nixon’s Drive, Carrie Hassler’s Hard Rain, Marty Raybon, and Blue Moon Rising. When you listen to his CD, there’s no tip-toeing about whether it’s bluegrass or not. There’s no piano, no drums or steel guitar. This is music that would have made Bill Monroe proud and, speaking of Mr. Monroe, he composed the title song, “Goodbye Old Pal.” Harper sings lead about his old paint horse. Friends and wives may desert you but you can trust your horse and dog. Junior Sisk sings the lead on another Monroe number, “Remember the Cross,” bluegrass gospel at its best.

You expect some good instrumentals on an instrumentalist’s solo project and Harper doesn’t disappoint us, although he didn’t dig very deep for a couple of them. “Cotton Eyed Joe” and “Old Joe Clark” have each been done a million times by the last count. Rambler’s Choice bandmate Jason Davis plays a hard driving banjo and Kevin McKinnon keeps pace on mandolin while Josh Swift gets some hot licks on the Dobro. Harper’s fiddling is excellent as is the guitar of Keith McKinnon. Another bandmate, Kameron Keller holds it all together on the bass. “Booth Shot Lincoln” isn’t as well known but has an interesting chord progression. It was originally a broadside ballad, probably written not long after the assassination. It does have lyrics with versions by Cisco Houston (late 1940’s) and Bascom Lunsford in a 1941 Library of Congress recording. It makes a good instrumental.

Dustin Pyrtle sings lead on a T. Michael Coleman song, “Her Memories [sic] Bound To Ride.” This is just good bluegrass. Another upbeat number is Ronnie Bowman’s “Enough On My Mind,” a song about hard times added to by his love leaving. Marty Raybon gives us a good version of the Newgrass Revival’s “This Heart of Mine,” a song that should be heard more often. Junior Sisk comes back with his version of Larry Sparks’ “Goodbye Little Darlin’.”

If you like your bluegrass the way Monroe did it, Jamie Harper is going to be a treat for you.

“Me Oh My” by the Honeycutters

The Honeycutters
Me Oh My
Organic Records

5 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

“I had a baby but the good Lord took her, she was an angel but her wings were crooked.” I love writing songs and sometimes I hear a lyric that I sorely wish I had written. One of our sons has handicaps (I know, that’s not the politically correct term) and, for me, the lyric nails it: an angel with crooked wings. That’s the opening line of the title song and it does not go downhill from there.

The Honeycutters label their music as country roots (watch lead singer Amanda Anne Platt discuss her music). That’s different than classic country (Jim Ed Brown, George Jones) but it’s a close cousin. Two of country’s enduring stars, Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, have composed some songs that you’re not likely to hear on a Bill Anderson or Ray Price recording. I can imagine Haggard and Nelson in an intimate setting (a resort bar at Lake Monroe, Indiana, where Nelson likes to stay when he’s in town) with something less than a thousand fans somewhere in the dark at the tables, jamming and drinking a beer or two. Some of those songs could come from this CD. Another surprise with this CD is all the tracks were composed by Platt. It isn’t unusual to see a CD with songs composed by the band or one person in the band, but not many are consistently this good from track to track.

“Lucky” is a quiet song of pathos, a love affair going down hill: “I’ve got the mind of a junkie, you’ve got the heart of a child.” That’s not a recipe for success but falling in love is rarely affected by the probability of success. There would be far fewer divorces if we were all that logical. “Jukebox” is on a different plane, as country as anything you would have heard on the radio back in the day. Rick Cooper’s bass supports the band and Josh Milligan’s percussion is enjoyable, not the thunk, thunk you hear too often on “country” records. Matt Smith adds to the mix with some very good steel guitar. “Not That Simple” includes some fine mandolin from Tal Taylor while Phil Cook appears with piano and organ. You’ll find yourself hoping Platt’s life isn’t as complicated and sad as all her songs. This song tells about a man and woman who love each other but have commitments to others. There are too many good lines in this song to list without just writing the lyrics.

Whether it’s a quiet song like “Little Bird,” an ode to wanting to break away from the life you’re living (“Hearts of Men”) or a critique (“Well, look at you, you’re like a pony with a broken leg, You’re always scared ’cause you can’t run away” from “All You Ever”) Platt consistently hits the mark musically and lyrically.

I suppose, if you live a Pollyanna life, if it’s all sunshine and roses, then this CD might puzzle you, you won’t get what she’s telling. On the other hand, if your life’s ups and downs look like the pulse line on a heart monitor, if you’ve ever felt the blues sucking at your soul, cursed and laughed at love, there are fourteen messages on this CD that you’re going to really enjoy. Me? I’m going to look for their first two CDs.

TheHoneyCuttersMeOhMyBigCov