“Steve Gulley & New Pinnacle” by Steve Gulley & New Pinnacle

Steve Gulley & New Pinnacle
Steve Gulley & New Pinnacle
Rural Rhythm Records

4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Steve Gulley has been around the block a time or two. A veteran of Renfro Valley, he hit the national scene with Doyle Lawson, was a founding member of both Mountain Heart and Grasstowne, and spent some time with Dale Ann Bradley. He is a great tenor and lead singer and could have been a country music star back when they still played country music on the radio. It’s always a crowd-pleaser when he does a number like “The Grand Tour” and I’m looking forward to seeing him at Bean Blossom on June 18.

This new venture is a combination of country and bluegrass. Banjo player Matthew Cruby wrote “Mattie’s Run,” a fast moving instrumental also featuring Gary Robinson, Jr. (mandolin), guest Tim Crouch (fiddle), Bryan Turner (bass), and Gulley (guitar). As expected, they all pick like they were born with instruments in hand. Phil Leadbetter guests on Dobro and Mark Laws adds percussion on some of the tracks. If you like country music, you have to hear this version of Hank Cochran’s “Don’t You Ever Get Tired of Hurting Me.” “It’s a Long, Long Way To the Top of the World” is a well known number done by Jim & Jesse and the Osborne Brothers. The latter is the more soulful version and Gulley adds a big dose of soul with this version, sounding more country than bluegrass. “Every Time You Leave” is a Louvin Brothers song. Gulley’s version, with Amanda Smith, is reminiscent of the Emmylou Harris duet with Don Everly from her Blue Kentucky Girl CD. This is excellent music.

Gulley had a hand in writing several of the bluegrass numbers. “Leaving Crazy Town” is a hard-driving number while “She’s a Taker” is slower but still with good drive and shows off the band’s good harmony singing. Both were written with Blue Highway’s Tim Stafford. “You’re Gone” (written with Adam Haynes) has more of a country feel though played as bluegrass with a banjo/mandolin break. Winning the award for catchy hooks is another Gulley/Stafford song, “That Ground’s Too Hard To Plow” with the song’s title as advice about a heartbreaking woman.

“Not Fade Away” makes a good bluegrass number even though it was written by Buddy Holly and Norman Petty and is a well-traveled rock number, performed by the Rolling Stones and the Grateful Dead, to name just two more groups. It’s not always the song that makes the music bluegrass. Gulley also wrote the CD’s gospel number, “You Can’t Take Jesus Away.”

Gulley’s talent and style coupled with top quality musicians makes this a CD lovers of bluegrass and country will want to hear.

“The Legacy Continues” by Nathan Stanley

Nathan Stanley
The Legacy Continues
Nathan Stanley Entertainment

4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Nathan Stanley will soon be twenty-three years old and already has twenty-one years of experience on the road. He’s done a good job in the transition from playing spoons by the side of his papaw, Dr. Ralph Stanley, to being a full-fledged entertainer on his own. He still travels and appears with Dr. Stanley, but his tour schedule shows a handful of dates on his own with the Clinch Mountain Boys. Ralph Stanley, in his sixty-ninth year on the road playing bluegrass, still maintains a very busy touring schedule even if his on-stage performances have been scaled back in favor of his grandson and son, Ralph Stanley II. Since Ralph II has carved his own niche in the bluegrass world, many may conclude that the future of the Clinch Mountain Boys, possibly the longest-running band in bluegrass, rests with Nathan Stanley.

This CD saw a limited distribution in 2013 but has now been repackaged with two additional tracks. “(The) Rank Stranger” has been done countless times and is a Stanley Brothers original. Carter Stanley sung from a deep well of emotion and Nathan Stanley does a fine job of recreating that emotion while Dr. Ralph recreates his part in the song. “Will You Miss Me When I’m Gone” is another Stanley original. Here Brad Paisley joins Nathan Stanley in a slightly different version that is a beautiful rendition of this old song.

“Are You Missing Me” goes back to the Louvin Brothers and has also been recorded (1952) by Jim & Jesse and the Bluegrass Cardinals. Stanley stays true to the Jim & Jesse version, not dressing it up with a modern interpretation. “Love of the Mountains” is a Larry Sparks’ signature song. Sparks joined the Clinch Mountain Boys in 1964 and became Ralph Stanley’s singing partner when Carter Stanley died at the end of 1966. Nathan Stanley does ample justice to this great song that was penned by Allen Mills.

There’s little doubt that the Stanley legacy is in good hands with young Nathan Stanley (not to sell Ralph Stanley II short in any way). He speaks to his love of the music and his grandfather in “Papaw I Love You,” a song he wrote in honor of Ralph Stanley. He serves as front man for the Clinch Mountain Boys. Joining him on this CD are Dewey Brown (fiddle, baritone), Randall Hibbitts (upright bass, harmony) and Mitchell Van Dyke (banjo). Former CMB member Junior Blankenship plays guitar and sings baritone and Tony Dingus plays Dobro. Don Rigsby joins the group playing mandolin and singing harmony. This is an excellent lineup of musicians and singers.

The list of familiar bluegrass songs is long, including “Nobody’s Love Is Like Mine” and “For All the Love I Had Is Gone.” “Casualty of War” comes from a 2007 Larry Sparks’ CD, The Last Suit You Wear. “Calling My Children Home” has been recorded by Ralph Stanley and was the title of a 1977 album by the Country Gentlemen. “Let Me Rest At The End Of My Journey” is another familiar number, recorded by many artists through the years.

Nathan Stanley has put together an excellent tribute to his grandfather and to classic bluegrass. If anyone doubts his ability as an artist they need to hear this CD. If you like bluegrass the way it was done by Monroe, Flatt & Scruggs, the Johnson Mountain Boys and, of course, the Stanley Brothers, you’ll enjoy every track on this CD.

 

“Highways & Heartaches” by Hammertowne

Hammertowne
Highways & Heartaches
Mountain Fever Records
4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Out of the gate you get hard driving, traditional bluegrass that grabs you and holds your attention. You won’t be trying to guess the genre when you hear Hammertowne.

“Broken Heart Mended” was written by banjoist Brent Pack and is an excellent song. Pack got his start with Ernie Thacker and lists Ron Stewart as one of his influences. Stewart, known throughout bluegrass as an excellent banjo player and fiddler knows his way around a guitar and mandolin even though he professes otherwise. On this CD he sits in on fiddle. Pack plays a hard driving banjo and is joined by Dave Carroll and Scott Tackett (both: guitar, vocals), Chaston Carroll (mandolin, vocals) and Bryan Russell (bass, vocals). Dave Carroll’s songs have been recorded by the Lonesome River Band and IIIrd Tyme Out plus other nationally known bands. The picking and singing are excellent. The division of labor between the two guitar pickers seems to be Tackett playing rhythm when he sings and Carroll playing lead.

“Call Out His Name” is an uptempo gospel number with a melody that’s a bit on the repetitive side. “Hansel’s Barn Dance” is a good, medium-speed instrumental that shows off the band’s abilities on their instruments. I’ve heard Dr. Ralph sing “Pretty Polly” a bunch of times, but Hammertowne offers up “Polly’s Revenge,” penned by Dave Carroll to tell the rest of the story. Masked men break her killer out of jail and he thinks his future has just gotten brighter. Unfortunately, his rescuers are Polly’s father and brothers and they—well, you need to hear the song. “Heartaches and Pain” is a good bluegrass number about broken love. This is a good example of the band’s good harmony singing and arrangements. They are banjo-centric. Some bands leave empty banjo space now and then and that tends to emphasize the banjo when it is being played. Their choice isn’t uncommon in bluegrass and that’s to have the banjo firing all the time.

There’s a disconnect with Tack 6. The CD cover lists it as “Sad Song Melody” (Chaston Carroll) while the media player shows “You’re Not Here With Me.” Whatever it’s called, it’s a good song. The bassman isn’t doing anything spectacular, but spectacular isn’t the purpose of the bass. He’s up front in the mix providing a solid foundation and I think that’s great. “Nothing Left But Time To Do” (Dave Carroll) is all about regrets and prison and has a good line about sleeping all night with one eye open.

Hammertowne provides eleven good tracks on this CD, no throwaways, no compromises with the type of bluegrass I believe Monroe-Stanley-Marti-style bluegrass fans will enjoy. This is good music.

Notable release: “Built Upon the Rock” by the Balos Family

The Balos Family
Built Upon the Rock
Life Line Records

The Balos Family began performing in public in 2002 and now tour from their home base in Michigan. Since 2007 their CDs have been produced by Russell Easter of the well known Easter Brothers for Life Line Records. They are nine strong with the youngest being Joel, age 6. They play only bluegrass gospel, featuring the six instruments common to bluegrass, and this CD has ten tracks, eight composed by family members.

For more information, visit their website. Their CD can be purchased from Amazon.

By Larry Stephens

 

“The Music of the Stanley Brothers” by Gary B. Reid

Gary B. Reid
The Music of the Stanley Brothers
University of Illinois Press (2015)

4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

At Bean Blossom you sit on a gentle upslope from the stage. To your right is the entry road that goes down to the tail of the pond and the back of the stage before going back up to the Hippie Hill section of camping. The regulars all know when Dr. Ralph Stanley arrives or leaves, his long, white tour bus sliding along, all within hidden behind its windows. Soon after he arrives, someone will erect his pop-up shelter where he holds court to sign autographs and say hello to his fans. It wasn’t always like this.

When Carter Stanley was alive it was the Stanley Brothers show. Still today, a half century after Carter Stanley’s death, there are many songs sung on stage and around campfires that bear the Stanley Brothers name. Travel during the twenty years the brothers were active was by car or station wagon. The pace was often hectic, the financial rewards meager. Band members came and went frequently, as is still the case with many bluegrass bands. Bluegrass music, generally speaking, isn’t a lucrative endeavor unless you’re a breakout star, and many professional bluegrass musicians have another job to make ends meet. The Stanley Brothers stayed the course, putting their names into the bluegrass history books.

Remember when the brothers were doing that Rich-R-Tone session (#480700) back in 1948? When Art Wooten joined them? You don’t remember that?

Truth is, there are probably no more than a pickup-load of people who can remember all the band members through the years, let alone anything about the recording sessions or what was recorded when. But Gary B. Reid knows. In 1976 he sent a letter to Neil Rosenberg, a name known to many bluegrassers and author of Bill Monroe and his Blue Grass Boys: An Illustrated Discography (1974), that started, “For the past several years I have been trying to compile a combination biography/discography on the Stanley Brothers and the Clinch Mountain Boys.” Reid was nineteen and it would be another thirty-nine years before that book was published. That is dedication. He did other things along the way, including starting Copper Creek Records.

The book covers the two decades the brothers were a professional act. Both served during World War II. Carter was discharged in February 1946 and joined up with Roy Sykes for a while. Ralph’s discharge was in October 1946 and by November they were making appearances along with mandolinist Darrell “Pee Wee” Lambert and fiddler Bobby Sumner. Their last full concert was at Bill Monroe’s Bean Blossom facility. Carter died December 1, 1966, the victim of alcoholism.

This book is rich with information about their professional lives from one recording session to the next, where they were working and who was in the band. The data on the recording sessions is extensive. A typical entry is:

501103 Columbia session; producers: Art Satherly and Don LawCastle Studio, Tulane Hotel, 206 8th Ave., Nashville, TennesseeNovember 3, 1950

Carter Stanley: g|Ralph Stanley: b|Pee Wee Lamber: m

Lester Woodie: f|Ernie Newton: sb

4311 The Lonesome River (Carter Stanley)C. Stanley-L, R. Stanley-T, PW Lambert-HB 20816 HL-7291,HS-11177,ROU-SS-10,BCD-15564,CK-53798,B0007883-02

Neither the uncertainty surrounding song titles or the “borrowing” of songs are a focus of the book, but both are mentioned many times in these pages and this provides an interesting insight into the music business. Sometimes it’s using the same (or very similar) melody with more than one set of lyrics.

“The first song is ‘A Life of Sorrow.’ Carter and Ralph Stanley wrote it with an assist from George Shuffler. The melody is strikingly similar to a tune the Stanley Brothers had recorded earlier on Columbia, ‘I’m a Man of Constant Sorrow,’ and is a good example of how the Stanleys recycled old tunes to create ‘new’ material.” [p. 32, Columbia #4 (Session 520411)]

and

“… used it as an opportunity to recycle the melody to one of their earlier recordings, ‘Little Glass of Wine.’ Known by a number of titles, ‘Tragic Love’ is most commonly called ‘Silver Dagger.'”

There are other examples of songs known by a variety of titles, as well as songs with disputed ownership, songs sold by their composer then the buyer taking songwriting credits, and the practice of claiming credit before agreeing to record the song.

While information about their travels is provided as part of their story, it also becomes a story of its own. Their nomadic lifestyle wasn’t (and isn’t) unusual in the bluegrass world, nor for most other musicians. You have to wonder how families survived and that’s one place the book will leave you wanting. Other than a few mentions of Ralph Stanleys ex-wife, Peggy, and the tidbit that Carter Stanley wrote “Baby Girl” in honor of his year-old daughter, Doris, you won’t get a peek into their family life. There is no mention of how Carter’s bouts with the bottle affected their music. Given the amount of information contained in the book, it’s easy to believe Reid might have another book in him to let us better know Ralph and Carter Stanley as people.

This is an excellent reference for anyone interested in the Stanley Brothers years (but understand it stops with Carter Stanley’s death). I found it an interesting read with my only caution that you may find yourself getting bogged down trying to follow and remember all the histories of people and changes in the band. Don’t get lost in the detail, just keep the book handy when you need to look up something.

 

“Adkins & Loudermilk” by Adkins & Loudermilk

Adkins & Loudermilk
Adkins & Loudermilk
Mountain Fever Records

4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

If you use names like Monroe, Scruggs, Flatt, and Martin to define bluegrass, you can throw in Adkins and Loudermilk. There has always been a lot of room in the traditional bluegrass world to encompass differences in style and lyrics. The Stanley Brothers differ from Monroe who differs from the McReynolds Brothers. Edgar Loudermilk (IIIrd Tyme Out, Rhonda Vincent, Marty Raybon) and Dave Adkins (Republik Steel) are carving out their own niche.

This CD features a number of tracks composed by Adkins and/or Loudermilk but the one that may catch your attention on the first listen is an old public domain number that’s been recorded by innumerable artists in a variety of genre. I don’t recall hearing “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” done like an easy country ballad before, but I like it. A number that could lose some bluegrassers in the audience is Hoyt Axton’s “[Never Been To] Spain,” but it does give the musicians and singers a chance to vamp. Adkins is a good singer with a voice that gets more coarse as he drives up the force of his vocal, reminding me of Junior Sisk. Loudermilk is a ballad singer with a lot of range, easily getting down into the bass register. Loudermilk plays bass, while Glen Crain plays Dobro and sings harmony. Zack Autry plays mandolin and his father Jeff Autry plays guitar. Chris Wade plays banjo for the band. These are excellent musicians and the numbers are tastefully arranged and recorded. They stretch their legs on “Spain” but, overall, this picking will stand the test of bluegrass audiences.

“Where Do You Go When You Dream” touches on one of music’s favorite topics, love. It’s a question that has crossed the minds of many lovers: is she dreaming about me or…? “Blacksmoke George” (composed by Adkins and former bandmate, Wayne Benson) is darker, the story of a hunt for a badman that doesn’t end up well for the hunter. Love and murder, staples of bluegrass though they aren’t intertwined in this number. “Mournful Soul” is another dark song that for some reason calls “Long Black Veil” to my mind, even though they sound nothing alike. It’s another chance for some fine trading of the lead break between the guitar and banjo. Switching styles, “Georgia Mountain Man” (Loudermilk, Russell Moore and Wayne Benson) is all about growing up in a country home, learning sound values for your life, while “Cut The Rope” (Adkins) is an uptempo song that has an outlook that’s been echoed in spirit by many. Love ties two people together so, “if you’re going to walk away and leave me behind,” cut the rope. “Turn Off The Love” has a similar message but done as a heartbreaking ballad that would make a great country song. The band turns up the heat and tempo with “Backside of Losing,” a story about bad choices in life.

Good music, good bluegrass that will be welcomed on most any bluegrass stage. Mix in some fun with “Spain” and you have a good CD. Adkins and Loudermilk are on a road that should lead to continued success.

“Wood, Wire & Words” by Norman Blake

Norman Blake
Wood, Wire & Words
Plectrafone Records
5 stars (out of 5)

By Aaron Keith Harris

Norman Blake has had a Zelig-like knack for appearing at key points when American acoustic country and folk music has connected to mainstream culture—his guitar work has been part of Bob Dylan’s Nashville Skyline (1969), The Johnny Cash Show on ABC (1969-1971), John Hartford’s Aereo-Plain (1971), the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s Will the Circle Be Unbroken (1972), Robert Plant and Alison Krauss’ Raising Sand (2007), and the soundtracks to O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000), Cold Mountain (2003), Walk the Line (2005), and Inside Llewyn Davis (2013).

But unlike Woody Allen’s protean protagonist, Blake was significant to all of those projects because his nature doesn’t change—he’s the deep root to the past that gets stronger with time, a trait that has made him (probably) more widely heard—but not as well-known—as fellow guitar giants Doc Watson and Tony Rice, whose work prods tradition forward with force and ingenuity.

Blake’s specialty, as the news release accompanying this 12-track, 54-minute album notes, is “turn of the century ragtime guitar picking,” a style of music that formed when music made by the middle class in their parlors and ex-slaves in their fields trysted in brothels and saloons before giving birth to the blues and jazz.

An unaccompanied Blake takes us back to that era as we hear his fingers glide over the steel strings of his 1928 Martin 00-45 guitar* to produce the clear, bell-like tones of “Savannah Rag,” the gently bumping bass line of “Blake’s Rag,” the warm and shady “Chattanooga Rag,” and the stately precision of “Cloverdale Plantation March.”

Though they sound like tunes that could have been adapted from the catalog of Scott Joplin, these four compositions are Blake originals, as are all the other songs on the album—something I wasn’t aware of until looking at the liner notes after listening to the whole disc a few times.

The only internal clue that Wood, Wire & Words contains contemporary material at all is “Grady Forester’s Store and Cotton Gin,” Blake’s tribute to his boyhood home of Sulphur Springs—when gas was 19 cents a gallon and stamps were three cents—which begins:

Now the evening sun is sinking down in Georgia
‘Cross the gravel roads, the red clay and the pines
That old whippoorwill
He’s callin’ from the hill
Of some long-forgotten time

“Joseph Thompson Hare on the Old Natchez Trace,” “Black Bart,” “The Keeper of the Government Light on the River,” “The Incident at Condra’s Switch,” and “Farewell Francisco Madero” are all splendid folk songs full of detail and drama, and written by Blake from true-life events. Listening to him tell these tales in his laconic singing style is as enjoyable as it would be to hear Bret Harte or Mark Twain read one of their stories aloud in front of a warm fireplace on a cold night.

The only other contributor here is, happily, Nancy Blake, Norman’s wife and duet partner on the Grammy-nominated albums (for Best Traditional Folk Recording of the Year) Blind Dog (1988), Just Gimme Somethin’ I’m Used To (1992), While Passing Along This Way (1994), and The Hobo’s Last Ride (1996). The duo harmonize on the co-written “There’s a One Way Road to Glory,” a gospel message calling us toward freedom and away from war that is reminiscent of—and, sadly, as likely to go unheeded—as “Down By the Riverside.”

Blake’s brilliance at effortlessly making new music that sounds and feels as if it could be a hundred years old is what makes Wood, Wire & Words as enduring as anything else from the deep well of American music that Blake has been drawing from all along.

*Blake plays this guitar on all tracks, excepting “The New Dawning Day” and “”Farewell Francisco Madero,” on which he plays a 2004 Martin 000-28B Norman Blake Signature Edition guitar.