“Too” by Flatt Lonesome

Flatt Lonesome
Too
Mountain Home Records
4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

It’s long been rumored that some big–name country stars can’t sing on key, so they use auto–tuners in the studio and on the road. Bluegrass producers might use it in the studio (although I doubt it’s widespread) but I asked Tom Feller, who provides sound to venues like Bean Blossom (and is half of Feller & Hill) about having it in his equipment. He’s not aware of any bluegrass group using them on their live shows.

I’ve heard Flatt Lonesome’s live show. What you get on their CDs is what you’d hear jamming with them around the campfire. Their pitch is excellent and their harmony is as good as you’ll hear anywhere. This is their second CD and they continue to make excellent bluegrass music. “Slowly Getting You Out of the Way” is a hard–driving Randall Hylton song that features some good breaks. “I’m Ready Now” is another pure bluegrass number on the gospel side. Kelsi Robertson Harrigill sings the lead with siblings Buddy and Charli Robertson adding their signature harmony vocals.

The musicianship of the group is excellent, too. Buddy Robertson plays guitar; sister Charli Robertson plays fiddle while sister Kelsi Harrigill adds mandolin. Her husband, Paul Harrigill, plays banjo and guitar and the band is rounded out with Dominic Illingworth on bass and Michael Stockton on resophonic guitar.

“Dangerous Dan” is a Tim Stafford/Barry Ricks number with a twist. It’s the story of a hard times moonshiner who ends up as a God-fearing preacher. It seems there’s hope for all of us. Another good Hylton song is “So Far,” yet another story of broken love.

Then there’s the countrygrass. It’s been part of bluegrass almost forever: how many Louvin Brothers songs have appeared on bluegrass recordings? Crowds I have seen at live shows seem to like it; they certainly applaud it. Some people don’t. A banjo–playing friend called me this morning complaining about a bluegrass–marketed CD that sounded too much like country. If you don’t object to countrygrass, there’s some very good numbers on this CD.

“Letters Have No Arms” is a 1949 Ernest Tubb song that’s a great love song. (Bluegrassers may recognize a couple of other Tubb recordings: Wabash Cannonball and “one of his old favorites,” Drivin’ Nails In My Coffin.) “I Thought You Were Someone I Knew” is a waltz beat love song with an unusual fiddle interlude (some people might mistake the intro as flutes). “It’s Probably Just Her Memory Again” makes good bluegrass to my ears, but I can also imagine standing on the stage in a club singing it to a country crowd. Most times the country/bluegrass division is just the delivery and the instruments. “I Can’t Be Bothered” is very country, which is hardly surprising since it was recorded by Miranda Lambert. Of the two, I like Flatt Lonesome’s harmony better.

I expect the “too much country” argument will continue longer than it takes the pines to grow tall. If you aren’t concerned by it and like really good music, you need to run out and get this CD.

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“Five” by Balsam Range

Balsam Range
Five
Mountain Home Records

4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

The last release from Balsam Range was Papertown in 2012. As good as they are, that’s too long to wait. They are receiving the recognition such a good band deserves and, while it’s not the cover the the Rolling Stone, they did make the cover of the July issue of Bluegrass Unlimited.

Some of their music isn’t Flatt & Scruggs-style traditional bluegrass, but more countrygrass. This is music done in a bluegrass environment (the usual four to six acoustic instruments, three-part harmonies) but could be done on a retro-country stage (you know, country before it became countryhiphoprappop). Though some who love their traditional bluegrass as the only “true” bluegrass complain, the audiences I’ve seen love this music as well as they do Jimmy Martin songs. It seems to me to be a reasonable expansion of genre rather than a threat to it. Dan Seal’s hit “Everything That Glitters (Is Not Gold)” from more than two decades ago cerainly fits the countrygrass mold. Buddy Melton’s (fiddle) lead is good stuff, doing the song as much justice as Seals did. I keep playing this track over and over.

“Don’t Watch These Tears” could be a country song. Caleb Smith (guitar) handles the lead work on this fast-paced, troubled love number. “Too High a Price To Pay” features yet another lead singer, Darren Nicholson (mandolin), and is another love-is-gone song.

Balsam Range’s members are all accomplished musicians. Melton played with Doc Watson and has solo projects on the market. Surrett is a man of many musical accomplishments and has performed some beautiful gospel music. Pruett is a graduate of the Jimmy Martin school of music.

Banjoist Marc Pruett is the only band member who doesn’t sing. Bassist and resonator guitarist Tim Surrett takes the lead on “Songs I’ve Sung,” a change of pace from love. This is a song that looks ahead to the end of the road, wondering more what will happen to the songs he’s sung than what will happen to whatever he owns. It’s something many of us have wondered as we grow older: will we be remembered when we’re gone or just fade from the memories of our friends? They dip further back into the past with the late Micky Newbury’s 1971 classic, “The Future’s Not What It Used To Be,” using a piano and steel guitar for more of a country sound.

What’s a bluegrass album without a murder song? “Moon Over Memphis” is yet another song about love and murder, faster paced than many songs like this (“The Crime I Didn’t Do”, “Knoxville Girl“). They throw in a song that must have been written for me: “Monday Blues.” Monday mornings get here too soon. On the traditional side, Milan Miller co-wrote “I Spend My Days Below The Ground,” a story about the hard life in a mining town: in the mines young to help your family survive, your dreams dying in the dark until you go too young, a victim of an accident or disease. There’s a good reason there are so many mining songs in bluegrass. And then there’s the Civil War. “From a Georgia Battlefield” has an old-timey sound to it, telling again the story of that horrible war.

The bluegrass genre has been around six decades. The fan base has expanded to include people who enjoy the countrygrass sound and that doesn’t seem to be threatening a loss of the traditional side. Balsam Range is an excellent example of a 21st century bluegrass band and Five is an excellent bluegrass CD.

“In the Shadows” by New Outlook

New Outlook
In The Shadows
self-released
4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Bluegrass and gospel music have always gone hand–in–hand, from Bill Monroe’s The Gospel Spirit, with such great songs as “Get Down On Your Knees and Pray” and “I Am a Pilgrim,” to current masters such as Paul Williams. New Outlook, a midwestern regional band based in Ohio, joins the gospel field with an impressive CD.

Early pioneers in country music, with many of their songs now standards in bluegrass, the Bailes Brothers penned and recorded songs in the ’40s and ’50s. One of the numbers, composed in 1942 and based on a message Walter Bailes heard in 1937, recorded innumerable times, is “Dust On The Bible.”

There are several other oft-recorded songs on this CD, so you may wonder why you should listen to yet another version. New Outlook’s take on “Dust On The Bible” is a Charmin™ version, softer and gentler than many bluegrass versions I’ve heard. Husband–and–wife team Brad and Lori Lambert are the vocalists along with Caleb Daughtery. They feature great harmony singing and offer a good alternative to the country stylings of Hank Williams and Kitty Wells or the southern gospel style of the Chuckwagon Gang. Is it worthwhile listening to yet another version of “Dust” and these other songs? In this case, definitely.

They go back for versions of “Will He Wait A Little Longer,” a Stanley Brothers number and Dottie Rambo’s great song, “If That Isn’t Love.” “Beautiful Altar of Prayer” compares very well to Doyle Lawson’s version with Jamie Dailey singing lead, and that’s a tough act to follow. Other songs from the past include the old hymn “Pass Me Not (O Gentle Savior),” a banjo–driven version “Cryin’ Holy Unto The Lord” and “Are You Building On The Rock.”

Additional musicians are Dave Morrison on Dobro, Dewayne Guffey on mandolin, and Dave Johnson on fiddle and Dobro. It was engineered by Dan Ward, something not usually mentioned in a review but Ward turns in a good performance singing bass on “I’ve A Mansion Over In Glory.” It’s too bad they didn’t use him on more tracks.

Included are some original compositions by Brad Lambert, including the title track, “Half Remains Untold,” and “See You In The Morning,” which will bring some tears. It’s the story of a couple in love but the man dies. She’s left remembering him saying, “I’ll see you in the morning or I’ll see you in glory.”

There’s not a throwaway track on this CD. It’s going in my stack of play–these–often.

“In Our Own Words” by Bluegrass Express

Bluegrass Express
In Our Own Words
Plum River Records
3½ 
stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Founded by patriarch, guitarist, and vocalist Gary Underwood and his son (bass, guitar, vocals) Greg Underwood, Bluegrass Express is a (mostly) family band that’s now has added third generation member Jacob Underwood (banjo, mandolin, guitar, fiddle, vocals) and mandolinist Andy Hatfield. They are joined on this CD by Tim Crouch (fiddle), Sierra Hull (mandolin on “I’ll Be Gone”) and Bethany Burie (high baritone on “The Key To Heaven”).

Many have the opinion that some of the best harmony singing you’ll hear comes from family bands, and, and that holds true here. Also, all songs on this disc are Underwood family originals—a laudable effort when so many projects feature well-worn material—and the results vary from very good to not quite so good.

“I’ll Be Gone” is a pretty number about love problems, always a favorite subject for composers. It’s a countrygrass number—one that fits either a bluegrass or a classic country stage–and features Greg Underwood as lead singer. He has a good voice and is pleasant to hear singing. It features the banjo as a background instrument through much of the song and, for my taste, a bit more ingenuity would be welcomed, switching the instruments for some variation. I suppose it’s just a personal thing, but I just don’t much like an electric bass in bluegrass. The type of bass isn’t specified but it sounds to me like an electric flat-top. Decibel for decibel, note for note, I would enjoy an upright a lot more.

Gary Underwood sings lead on “It’s Raining Outside,” a slow, swinging, moody number with twin fiddles and nice breaks by the instrumentalists. This is a great number. He also sings lead on “Sinner Hear Me.” It has some swing to it, an interesting chord progression into some minor chords. You don’t hear many gospel swing numbers but they pull this one off nicely. Burie co-wrote the song she sings harmony on, “The Key To Heaven.” This is a good song but she’s low in the mix, mostly a function of not dialing back the lead on the chorus. That’s too bad for she’s a good singer.

“There’ll Never Be Another You” is a fairly typical love–is–gone song—it’s not easy to come up with a fresh take on one of the oldest themes around. “Down In Tennessee” reflects on how much the singer loves Tennessee even though he has to be on the road. This is a good uptempo number and shows off the talents of the pickers.

Getting back to countrygrass, “New True Love” is a good number with a walking bass line. If you like country music you’ll love it, but it may circle people back to the “too much country in bluegrass” argument. I don’t think bluegrass is in danger of losing its identity, of becoming the new real country music with Jimmy Martin’s style of music lost in the shuffle. “Baby’s Gone For Good” is another heartbreaker with a more interesting arrangement, saving most of the instruments to come in after a few bars. It’s a good song, but you may re-start it a time or two as it has an odd, 2–beat pickup start.

This is a good CD, well worth a listen by anyone who enjoys countrygrass.

“Here Come Feller & Hill Again” by Feller & Hill

Feller & Hill
Here Come Feller & Hill Again
Blue Circle Records
4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Bluegrass is both narrow and broad. It’s narrow because stepping outside the accepted six instruments causes queasiness in a lot of people. Steel guitar? Uh…maybe. Just don’t bring it on stage. Piano? Okay if it’s Buck White but keep the volume low. Drums? Whew, boy, bluegrass is going rock ‘n’ roll. The reaction to including country songs is usually less acidic, and you hear southern gospel, blues, old timey and rock songs.

On this new CD Tom Feller and Chris Hill push the bluegrass envelope a bit with a steel guitar (Hill, who also plays banjo, guitar and adds vocals) and drums (Feller, who adds guitar, mandolin, bass, Dobro on “The Government Blues” and vocals), but they aren’t straying too far from the bluegrass formula.

“Hey Baby” isn’t Bill Monroe traditional but it is from the pen of Aubrey Holt (Boys From Indiana, Feller’s uncle). Holt also wrote “Here Comes Polly,” a good bluegrass number that features Cody Jones singing bass. Keeping it in the family, Feller’s mother, Judy, contributes “Stone Woman Blues.” This is a good number in the classic country vein and features the great Michael Cleveland (another southern Indiana boy) on fiddles. Cleveland plays fiddle on most tracks with Glenn Gibson playing Dobro.

This underlines an important feature of their music—it’s aimed at the bluegrass market (a more viable market than classic country) and is well accepted by the bluegrass crowd (the Bean Blossom watchers were very enthusiastic), but it tends to be more classic country than bluegrass. This is acoustic country music, so it fits in a bluegrass environment, though no doubt those with purist leanings would complain. I had a chance to talk with Chris Hill and he tells me that their selection of classic country music is intentional, an aim for a niche market that isn’t being explored in depth by other bluegrass artists. Instead of bluegrass with an occasional country song, they are doing classic country in a bluegrass/acoustic format and their next CD, on the final production laps, will be a country CD with no pretensions of bluegrass music.

Tom T and Dixie Hall have written many good songs for bluegrass and they add two here. “The Government Blues” is a fine number that would have fit Jimmy Rodgers well, relating the many woes of taxes and no money. “Tired of Losing You,” with Rhonda Vincent adding vocals (co-written with Billy Smith), is a great country love song. This is the only number that you’ll hear Chris Hill’s steel work but it blends well and is not at all over the top. Another famous name from country music is Faron Young, who composed “Forget The Past.” Feller & Hill underscore the resemblance they bear to Buck Owens and Don Rich but on this number Hill has styling closer to Faron Young’s.

Speaking of Owens and Rich, Feller wrote a number in honor of their memory and includes bits of several of their hits in it. “The Ballad of Buck and Don” is tribute to one of the best duets in the history of country music.

They nod to gospel music with a Joyce “Dottie” Rambo song, “When Is He Coming Again.” It’s a story of fighting betwwen families and when will Jesus come again to relieve us of all the darkness of the world. Heather Berry-Mabe adds vocals to this track. They turn to bluegrass tradition with a Don Reno number, “He’s Coming Back To Earth Again,” singing it it the echoing style of Reno & Smiley.

“It’ll Be Too Late” is another good country song while “Never Ending Song of Love” will be familiar to many. Made popular by Delaney & Bonnie, whose members at times included Duane Allman and Gregg Allman, George Harrison, Leon Russell, Rita Coolidge and Eric Clapton, it was also recorded by George Jones and Tammy Wynette. This is the only track with drums. I asked Hill why they included drums and he told me the track seemed to be missing something and adding the drums tied it all together. But the wildest selection is “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue,” a Richard Rogers number recorded by such diverse groups as The Ventures and The London Festival Orchestra, though you’ll have a hard time hearing Feller & Hill’s version in the orchestral recording. Crazy as the idea may sound, this makes a good instrumental for a bluegrass band.

If you like country mixed with bluegrass you’ll thoroughly enjoy this up-and-coming duo.

“Down on the Farm” by the Stevens Family Bluegrass Band

The Stevens Family Bluegrass Band
Down On The Farm
Mountain Fever Records
4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Family bands—parents and kids—often must suffer comparison to the Cherryholmes clan since their remarkable success. The Stevens Family Band is the Cherryholmes meets Duck Dynasty. When they’re at home JW (the dad) enjoys coon hunting (a favorite of Jimmy Martin and myself) and running his trapline with Luke, number seven of ten children. Four (Sissy, 1974), seven (Luke), eight? (Ben, 1983), nine (Sam, 1990) and ten (Tommy, 1997) join Dad and Mom (Nancy) to make up the band.

Given that JW Stevens is a minister it’s not surprising that the CD is heavy with spiritual songs. “City of Gold” (Nancy Stevens singing lead) is a good, upbeat gospel number. The vocalists are all good (Sissy and Luke Stevens singing harmony) and it’s a good arrangement. She also sings lead on “How Great Thou Art,” done a cappella, showing their strong harmony singing with children Luke, Sissy and Ben joining in, though Ben struggles a bit with the lower registers of the bass part. Her other lead number is shown here as “Search The Book” by Jerry Golf (actual title, “Please Search the Book Again” by Jerry Goff) and it’s a great gospel number. They include a drop to a minor as a transition from the 1 chord to the 4 chord and it’s a perfect touch. You can hear different arrangements on the web and this is the best I’ve heard.

JW Stevens sings lead on one number with Nancy singing harmony. “Old Fashion Love” is secular, a description (in their own words) of their relationship. This makes a beautiful love song.

The title song was penned by Sissy Stevens and is a picture of the family. Songs like this often fail because the lyrics or melody just can’t make the grade—too cute, too simplistic, too focused on the writer—but this is a vary good number and should have wide appeal to other bands looking for a good song. Brother Luke penned “She’s The One,” a story about being on the road and leaving loved ones behind. It’s a good, hard driving number and is especially interesting because it’s a display of the instrumental abilities of the band. They tend to be laid back on most of their numbers, providing good support but no sparkling breaks. This track leaves no doubts about them as pickers.

“A Living Prayer” (Ron Block) is a powerful gospel number and Sissy, Luke and Ben provide powerful harmony to drive it. The late Randall Hylton wrote “Where Rainbows Touch Down,” an illustration of his songwriting abilities and yet another beautiful harmony number.

This is a CD that may get overlooked in a crowded marketplace but it is definitely worth a listen. You’ll be glad you took the time.

“Memory of a Mountain” by Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers

Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers
Memory Of a Mountain
self-released

3½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

The Lady Slippers are unusual (but not unique) as an all-female bluegrass band. They’re from Cincinnati and have a solid regional reputation. A look at their upcoming events shows them working in Ohio and several surrounding states. The biographical information for the members (Ma Crow, Trina Emig, Margie Drees, Vicki Abbott) lists a number of bands they’ve performed in (Chicken Deluxe, Jennie Lyn Band, Dr. Twang and the Stainless Steel) but you may not recognize the names.

They describe their music as bluegrass/American/mountain, and it indeed sounds like some combination of bluegrass and old-timey. Drees penned three of the numbers. “Liberty Hill” is a song about trying to find liberty from oppression and fits the bluegrass mold. Ma Crow sings lead on all the vocal tracks and here she’s joined by Drees singing harmony. Their playing is good as are the harmonies. The title song has a very pretty melody and tells a sad story of the Appalachians: mining has destroyed many mountains and this is a story of memories before mining took away the beauty. Emig has a melodic banjo break that will catch your attention. Staying with the mountain theme, the third Drees number is “Daughter of the Mountain” and is more-or-less the story of Ma Crow’s mother, Nadine. All good tracks, very close to classical bluegrass with a touch of old-time feeling.

Ma Crow as a lead singer fares well but, as always, personal taste has to be considered. Her singing voice is much closer to Hazel Dickens than to the standard crop of modern bluegrass female vocalists. Production qualities are good, not surprising since the CD was mixed and mastered by Ron Stewart. Stewart, a good singer with a husky, smoker’s voice, makes a gigantic vocal contribution by adding a couple of grunts during “Get Up John.” Emig plays a good mandolin on this number and Drees plays fiddle. The fiddle playing is adequate but won’t blow you away.

“Shady Grove” and “Ages and Ages Ago” are familiar numbers. “Time Is Winding Up” is a public domain gospel number presented in an old-time, unadorned way that you might not recognize if you’ve heard Helen Millers version. I’ll stick with the acoustic version. “Going To The West” is another old number and features some of their best harmony singing, and they have a good presentation of “Montana Cowboy,” done by Emmylou Harris as “Montana Cowgirl.”

The one song that simply loses me is “No Mermaid.” This is a Sinéad Lohan song, covered by Joan Baez and sounds out of place in this album setting.

The picking is good, though none of it will blow away your toupee. The singing is all good as long as you like this style of unadorned melody. Given the status Hazel Dickens in this music, a lot of people do. It’s worth a listen.

 

“Randy Cook & Commonwealth Bluegrass Band” by Randy Cook & Commonwealth Bluegrass Band

Randy Cook & Commonwealth Bluegrass Band
Randy Cook & Commonwealth Bluegrass Band
Pulley Tunes
3½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

A lot of good music is made in bluegrass by bands that don’t have national recognition. Listen to Commonwealth Bluegrass on “Dry Run Creek,” a number best identified with the Seldom Scene’s 1995 Dream Scene album. They get it right, with an eerie feel by playing it in a minor chord and the high tenor’s slide up on the bridge. They do a good job on “Ashes of Love,” the old Johnnie & Jack song that’s been recorded and sung so many times the words are worn out. Randy Cook sings on-key and keeps time and that’s the basic requirements for bluegrass and country, and on-key isn’t always accomplished by artists. (That’s not a dig at bluegrass and country singers. Jim Nabors has great technical vocal abilities but I can’t hear him doing “Dark Hollow.”)

The numbers written by banjo player Malcolm Pulley are good bluegrass, a bit in the Jimmy Martin do-it-simple vein. “Living In The Country” is a description of life in the country, from watermelon to corn likker. Mike Sharp has a great Dobro break on this track. “Wearing My Heart Out On My Sleeve,” featuring fiddle by Ron Stewart, is a love song that Martin might have sung. The lyrics don’t challenge your imagination much as they strive to rhyme but it’s bluegrass that the crowds will enjoy. Pulley has some very good banjo breaks scattered throughout the CD.

Lance Seal is a competent bass players but he’s playing a stick bass (based on one of their videos) and you can make those sound like a Fender or a Kay. His sounds like a Fender. I’m not a purist but I don’t like the Fender sound in bluegrass. Jason Owen does good guitar work on “The Door Is Always Open,” the Dave & Sugar song that went to #1 on the country charts. This is yet another country song that plays well in bluegrass. Waylon Jennings put the song out in 1975 but his release of “Rose In Paradise” was several degrees more popular and Commonwealth Bluegrass has a good version on this CD. Either in the studio or the mix they should have done some filtering on this song as the S’s are sibilant, but it’s still enjoyable and a good arrangement.

Guitarist Jason Owen penned “He Wants To Be A Daddy Now,” a touching song about a man who abandoned his daughter then later has a change of heart. If you like broken love songs you’ll like “Getting Over You,” or perhaps a number that’s traditional like “Molly Rose” written by Lynnwood Lunsford, and if you’ve never heard “Purple Valley Blues” you’re in for a treat.

“Carter Girl” by Carlene Carter

Carlene Carter

Carter Girl

Rounder Records

5 stars (out of 5)

By Donald Teplyske

Lives are filled with regret.

Carlene Carter’s story is well documented. In brief, she is the child of June Carter and Carl Smith, ex-wife of Nick Lowe, star of the “Cruel To Be Kind” video, a recording artist with several memorable performances before becoming an overnight success in 1990 with “I Fell in Love” and a series of hit and near-hit singles.

Then came the darkness, the lost and non-recording years, the substance abuse and career implosion. I’m guessing Carter has her share of misgivings about her life, the opportunities squandered, the negative impacts she may have had on herself and others.

I’m confident she has no uncertainties surrounding the recording of Carter Girl, the album many of us have been waiting for her to create since we first heard her sing. Beneath the spunk, rockin’ country, and the irreverence, and long before “I Fell in Love,” many knew that she would one day release an album that truly spoke to and explored her familial and musical roots. Performances from her TNN series Carlene Carter: Circle of Song—clips of which are on YouTube—reveal the appreciation she had for the music of the original Carter Family, of Mother Maybelle, and that of the Carter Sisters.

For the last decade—as she cleaned up her life and fully embraced the legacy afforded to her—Carter has grown stronger and fully blossomed. She was well-received in the theatrical performance Wildwood Flowers, and her album Stronger made numerous year-end ‘best of’ lists in 2008.

While she has consistently kept her family close on her albums—A.P.’s “The Winding Stream” was featured on Little Acts of Treason, which also featured Carl Smith on a reprise of his chart topping “Loose Talk,” Stronger‘s title track and “The Bitter End” contain more than a little autobiography, she’s recorded “Foggy Mountain Top,” “Ring of Fire,” and “My Dixie Darlin’” on various albums, and as liner writer Jim Bessman notes, going back to 1978′s “Never Together (But Close Sometimes),” Carter was using the Carter scratch method of picking—never has she dedicated an album highlighting her family’s importance on her music.

Now in her late-fifties, and completely comfortable with herself and her place as a bridge to country music’s past, Carter has, with producer Don Was, brought together an all-star band and several guests to celebrate and honor the legacy of her family. She has frequently spoken of having felt an obligation to carry the music of the Carters to subsequent generations, and with Carter Girl she has certainly done Maybelle, A.P., Sara, June, Anita, and Helen proud.

The album includes ten songs selected from the immense Carter catalogue. To her credit, Carter hasn’t selected only the most familiar songs—no “Wildwood Flower,” for example, nor then “Will The Cirlce Be Unbroken,” “No Depression in Heaven,” or “Keep On the Sunny Side.” She’s dug deep, searching out, connecting with and revitalizing timeless songs.

The formidable “Little Black Train” kicks off the album, as astute a choice as any made with the disc. This song with a clear message of getting right with the Lord pulses with conviction and forewarning, and the vocal harmonies of the amazing Elizabeth Cook and Joe Breen (Mr. Carlene Carter) on the chorus make things that much more intense. As expected, the song is livelier in Carlene Carter’s hands than when recorded by her forbears in 1935, with the rhythm section of Was and Jim Keltner propelling the song.
Cook shows up throughout the album, never more impressively than on the full-blown duet “Blackie’s Gunman.” Carter no longer attempts to hit the highest notes she once did, and leaves these to Cook who nails the harmony parts. Carter’s voice is huskier, more robust than in her video play days, but this works wonderfully with this material. She still sings like a dream. Sam Bush contributes mandolin to this track, making the instrument’s sound to slightly resemble an autoharp.

Aunt Helen’s venerable “Poor Old Heartsick Me,” a hit for Margie Bowes, is the type of song that almost anyone can sing-along with, while “Troublesome Waters” proves once again how difficult it is to listen to others sing with Willie Nelson. For me, this is the album’s only stumble. Willie is Willie, of course, and while it isn’t musical malpractice, it does interrupt the flow of the album.  I’ve long wondered why female singers attempt to harmonize with Nelson on slow-tempo numbers. Both Nelson and Carter’s vocal parts sound good in isolation, but to my ears their blend doesn’t. The performance is forced. Would it have worked better had they been eye-to-eye in the same studio when recording? Possibly.  I just know I would rather have heard Carter sing the song without Nelson.

More successful is when Kris Kristofferson drops by to join in on “Black Jack David.” The song, one of many that A.P. Carter borrowed from the folk tradition, works largely because the two singers match each other’s phrasing more comfortably than Nelson and Carter do. Carter also provides guitar accompaniment in the style of Mother Maybelle, a very noticeable contribution.
Utilizing modern technologies, Carter closes out the album singing with her mother, aunts, and Johnny Cash on “I Ain’t Gonna Work Tomorrow,” an emotionally abusive song of codependency disguised as a working man’s protest if ever there was one, while Carter sings June’s “Tall Lover Man” like the country classic it should be.

Within an artistic creation with no end of highlights, two of the most dramatic come directly from Carter’s imagination. “Lonesome Valley 2003″ is built around the classic spiritual, but is made more intense through the inclusion of Carter’s lyrics sharing the heartbreak of her family’s losses of that year.

The instrumentation of this track is beautiful—Carter’s piano, Rami Jaffee on Hammond, and guitars from Greg Leisz and Blake Mills—while Carlene sings as if she is in a country church, paying tribute to her loved ones. The emotion in her voice is palatable, and she says she genuinely choked up on the final verse. With lesser singers, this would be an affectation; for Carter, it’s the truth: she’s lived this song. Vince Gill’s vocal support may go unnoticed upon first listen, but it’s there on the chorus giving the arrangement additional depth.

The greatest song Carlene Carter may have ever written is re-recorded for this collection. “Me and the Wildwood Rose” originally appeared on the breakthrough I Fell in Love album, and at the time was a dramatic statement that—notwithstanding the country-rock beats of the title track and the video and stage prancin’ that accompanied it—she was a still a Carter girl.

A tribute to her grandmother and her aunts, the song wistfully reminisces about the days and nights on the road in the car with “grandma and her girls.” Now that all those mentioned in the song are gone, including the Wildwood Rose herself, Carter’s sister Rosey, the song assumes additional dimension. It was a stunning performance then, and it is even more so now, and it is on this track that Carter sounds most at ease—reinterpreting herself for a new generation, if they’re listening.

No regrets then with Carter Girl. At 47 minutes, it is a substantial project. The reservations I have with Willie Nelson’s performance are likely a product of my own prejudice; Was and Carter obviously appreciated what he brought to the studio.

The album is more than a tribute album to the various branches of the Carter family. It is the testament of a granddaughter, daughter, and niece committing herself fully to the legacy she has always embraced, a promise long ago made that the circle would remain unbroken.

“Into My Own” by Bryan Sutton

Bryan Sutton
Into My Own
Sugar Hill Records

4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Bryan Sutton keeps select company with the very best musicians in bluegrass, those musicians who may have peers but no superiors. He is well known in the bluegrass and country worlds, with credits on many CDs. He plays with speed and drive, qualities often confused by people unfamiliar with this kind of music. A performance without drive, no matter how fast, is like fishing in a boat on a calm lake. More speed just means the fish are biting. Drive is being on that boat on a river. A slow song with drive is the Mississippi; a fast one with drive is the Colorado. Drive pulls you with the song, makes you anticipate the next measure. It is good.

Given Sutton’s association with bluegrass, you might be surprised if you pick up his new CD. This is better described as (mostly) acoustic music rather than bluegrass, because he ventures into old-time numbers and jazz as well as some countrygrass, the body of music that exists in both worlds of bluegrass and country. “Cumberland Reel” is played with speed in 4/4 time. It features interesting interplay between Sutton, fiddler Stuart Duncan, Noam Pikelny on banjo and Sam Bush playing mandolin. The bassist is Greg Garrison. There are many numbers like this that are not in the usual bluegrass playbook but enjoyed by bluegrass pickers. “Watson’s Blues,” on the other hand, isn’t quite a standard, but it was composed by Bill Monroe as a tribute to Doc Watson. Bluegrass bands need to learn this one again.

“Frisell’s Rag” is a delightful, jazzy interchange of melody lines between Sutton, jazz guitarist Bill Frisell and excellent bass work by Dennis Crouch. If your image of waltzes is “Kentucky Waltz,” or maybe ladies in long dresses dancing to Blue Danube, Sutton’s composition “Overton Waltz” will be a surprise. It is in 3/4 time but the similarities end there. It’s fast and, again, features interplay between all the lead instruments (Sutton-Pikelny-Bush-Duncan).

Sutton’s selection of numbers switches types of music with abandon. “Ole Blake,” another number by Sutton, could easily be heard as a traditional, old-time number like “Swannanoa Tunnel.” The tunnel is a real place near Asheville and the song was recorded in the ’20′s by Bascom Lamar Lunsford, sung here by Ronnie McCoury. Joining on the instrumental side is brother Rob McCoury on banjo and Jason Carter playing fiddle. “Log Jam” has a more modern sound, could be bluegrass but has some jazz influences as well. “Anyhow, I Love You,” a Guy Clarke number, another Sutton and McCourys track, is a version I prefer over Lyle Lovett’s intepretation.

This is good music. Don’t expect pure bluegrass even though it’s loaded with bluegrass artists, but if your tastes are a little more eclectic than Jimmy Martin and Flatt & Scruggs—and you like great guitar picking—you’re going to enjoy it.