“Rachel Burge & Blue Dawning” by Rachel Burge & Blue Dawning

Rachel Burge & Blue Dawning
Rachel Burge & Blue Dawning
Mountain Fever Records
4 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

What’s bluegrass without songs of death? Murder songs are woven into the culture and are evidence of how bluegrass remains tied to its roots—and most of us believe that’s a good thing. Maggie and Molly, “Sisters of the Mountain,” are twins living alone on the mountain all their lives and who fall in love with Joshua Taylor, a Blue Ridge mountain man. They catch Joshua in the arms of another woman and he disappears forever. I know places where that still might happen.

Rachel Burge nails the song and she and the band do it with drive. You won’t be confusing this with indie country, Americana, or any other genre. The arrangement grabs your attention, with Burge and Michele Birkby-Vance (fiddle) joined at the hip on their vocals.

Birkby-Vance wrote and sings “Homeplace in the Mountains,” a pure bluegrass number that’s yet another core of bluegrass: away from home and longing to go back. Burge adds “My Cold Heart,” a hard driving love song from a different angle. She’s a woman who rejects love because of her cold heart and she’s the one who’s leaving and wronging someone. Burge combined a college education with bluegrass, obtaining a certificate in bluegrass from Glenville State College. This allowed her to play with Mac Wiseman, Ronnie Reno, and others as part of that program. She’s not only an excellent bluegrass singer, she knows how to play her mandolin as well as anyone you’ll hear out on the circuit. “Please Stay Away” is a pretty love song in waltz time, asking a person she loves to please stay away. Love hurts and she tells us about it in a very pretty way.

Joining Burge and Birkby-Vance are Radford Vance (banjo, guitar, vocals), Lance Gainer (guitar, vocals) and Rick Westerman (bass, vocals). Radford Vance composed “Road Apples,” an excellent instrumental that showcases the excellent musicianship of each member of the band – except the bass player. For some reason they made the choice to keep him so low in the mix you have to work at hearing him. What comes through sounds good, though. Vance also gives us “Barefootin’,” recollections of a youth growing up in the country.

Burge reaches out to other composers, including Bill Carlisle and Tommy Cutrer, who wrote “I’ve Kissed You My Last Time,” a beautiful country ballad released by Kitty Wells back in 1955 and Doyle Lawson in 1995; Ronnie Bowman, co-writer of “I’ve Seen Enough of What’s Behind Me,” a song with a hook about not needing a rear-view mirror because the singer is only looking ahead in life; “April Snow” by Mark Brinkman, another song about broken love; and Rebecca Westerman’s “Living In The Light,” a gospel number that features the group’s excellent harmonies.

This is an excellent CD from a group that should make a lasting impression on bluegrass music.

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“Chapter Two” by Carolina Story

Carolina Story
Chapter Two
True Bearing Entertainment
3½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

Carolina Story is the husband and wife team of Ben and Emily Roberts. Chapter Two is the followup to last year’s well received Chapter One, reflecting the continuing maturation of their music. One downside to be noted: it is an “extended play” CD, jargon for only getting six tracks.

Their voices blend well together. The lead song is a story about friendship on the road, though I have to admit I’m still trying to match “It’s Almost Over Now” with the lyrics, uncertain about what is almost over. Friendship? Traveling together? Anyway, it’s a pleasant song for listening. Their music is modern country with some tracks not far removed from classic country. “I Won’t Let You Down” is a story about courtship and has the formula for their music. The session band plays backup, throw in a few licks and a kickoff on each song but avoid sparkle of their own. It’s about the singers and the lyrics. The band members are capable musicians, including Chad Cromwell playing drums (and I still wish someone would let the drummer be creative), Billy Panda playing guitar and Michael Rhodes on bass. They’re joined by steel player Dan Dugmore and Darrell Scott playing guitar, bouzouki and mandolin. It’s too bad they never get a chance to express their talent with an instrumental track or extended breaks, but that’s country music, especially modern country.

Their signature is singing as a duo. They sound great together but I think they could add more diversity to their sound by playing off each other, one singing and one responding or some similar arrangement on more tracks. For some reason, constant duoism wears on my ears. Ben does take the lead on “When I Was Just a Boy” and it works well, telling of the warnings he received from his parents and how he hasn’t always listened. “Crash and Burn” is a rocking song and should have a chance at the hot new country market. “I’m Gonna Love You Forever” is another track with Ben taking the lead and Emily joining in on harmony.

They certainly have their fans, including Manuel, the man behind all the rhinestones you’ve seen on the Opry for so many years. They’re averaging over 130 shows a year for the past five years and that’s a lot of wear on your soul and sneakers. Good music and a bright future – they have a lot going for them.

“The Next Move” by Phil Leadbetter

Phil Leadbetter
The Next Move
Pinecastle Records
5 stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

I’ve been around music most of my life and had the privilege to perform with some very talented people. I deeply appreciate the art of making music and the skill of musicians like the ones on this album.

Phil Leadbetter appreciates them, too, and he’s one of the best on the instrument that Josh Graves help make famous: the resophonic guitar. Struggling with severe illness, facing death, “Uncle Phil” made a list of great musicians he wanted to make a recording with, if he could do it just one more time. He had to wait until his cancer was in remission to do it, and now he’s fighting it in a second round, but he got it done. I saw him on stage (during his first round) for a salute to J. D. Crowe at Bean Blossom and he was obviously struggling, but he still made the reso ring beautifully.

Resophonic guitar or Dobro? The terms are often used interchangeably but they really shouldn’t be. The resophonic (or resonator) guitar has some type of resonator built into the top. The list of possibilities is too long to discuss here, but it’s usually a metal plate full of holes. Generally played in bluegrass flat with a bar and fingerpicks like a pedal steel guitar (Tut Taylor was an exception, using a straight pick), it may be found in a blues setting played like a regular guitar or with a bottleneck slide.

Dobro is a trade name originally associated with the Dopyera brothers, John Dopyera was the original developer of the resonator guitar. Despite efforts to control “Dobro” as a trademark, it has entered mainstream usage as synonymous with resophonic guitar.

Playing bass is either Mike Bub or Tim Dishman while Steve Thomas is everywhere playing mandolin, fiddle and guitar, one or more on almost every track. Shawn Camp wrote and sings lead on “Pull The Trigger.” He and Thomas play guitar and Camp’s Earls of Leicester buddy, Charlie Cushman plays banjo. Steve Gulley and Don Rigsby, two great voices in bluegrass, sing harmony while Alan Bibey plays mandolin and Tim Crouch plays fiddle. Camp is also featured on an introspective “Jesus, My Old Dog and Me.” Harking back to Flatt & Scruggs, “Just Joshin'” was written by Josh Graves and Jake Tullock. Cory Walker (banjo), Kenny Smith (guitar) and Sierra Hull (mandolin) join Bub and Crouch to support Leadbetter, Rob Ickes and Jerry Douglas on this salute to the reso guitar. Leadbetter joins with son Matt on Dobro along with Thomas, Crouch and Bub plus Jarrod Walker (mandolin) to do a Leadbetter tune, “Leadbelly.”

“Sweet Georgia Brown” isn’t contained by genre lines and Leadbetter and crew give a rousing performance here, lots of swing and jazz, but hey, with Béla Fleck on banjo and Buck White playing piano (along with Hull, Thomas, Bub and Smith) what else would you expect? Another number in the jazz and blues vein is “Georgia On My Mind.” It’s been done by legions of performers but many associate it with Ray Charles. You need to hear Con Hunley’s rendition. Steve Thomas doubles on mandolin and fiddle and Mike Bub plays a great bass line with Jim Hurst doing the guitar work. Too bad they couldn’t make this one thirty minutes long.

Going country, Ken Mellons co-wrote and sings “I’m a Modern Day Interstate Gypsy” with musicians named already and Gulley and Mark Newton adding harmony. Gulley co-wrote “I’ve Never Seen a Love That Wasn’t Blind” and sings it along with Dale Ann Bradley, Leadbetter’s current bandleader. Steve Wariner plays guitar and also co-wrote and performs another number, “Hole In The Earth,” a song about escaping the fate of a coal miner’s life—almost. He leaves but he comes back and now spends his life digging for coal in this hole in the earth.

Rounding out the first eleven tracks are John Cowan and Sam Bush, along with Jake Stargel playing guitar, tearing it up with “I’m a Ramblin’ Rolling Stone” while Marty Raybon and Joe Diffie, with Paul Brewster singing harmony, soften the tone with “Baptism.” “Down with the old man, up with the new,” that says it all about baptism and Raybon’s soulful voice is impossible to beat on a song like this but Diffie is right there with him.

From his posts on the bluegrass listserv and Facebook, it’s clear that Phil Leadbetter is a man of faith. He closes with a soulful, peacefully slow solo rendition of “When The Roll Is Called Up Yonder.” Friends and fans alike will remember this cut forever.

This is bluegrass at its best from some of the best in the business joining a contemporary master in his labor of love and life.

 

“Standing Tall and Tough” by Crowe, Lawson & Williams and “Open Carefully, Message Inside” by Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver

Crowe, Lawson & Williams
Standing Tall and Tough
Mountain Home Music Company
4 stars (out of 5)

Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver
Open Carefully, Message Inside
Mountain Home Music Company
4 stars (out of 5)

By Aaron Keith Harris

An 18-year-old Doyle Lawson joined Jimmy Martin and the Sunny Mountain Boys as the groups banjo player in 1963, not long after JD Crowe made himself a bluegrass legend in that same post. If at that time I would have told you that Lawson would end up (arguably) having a greater influence on the direction of bluegrass music than either the King or the Claw, you wouldn’t have bought it. But here we are 50 years later with two fine albums that help make that argument.

By Lawson’s count in the liner notes, Open Carefully is the 36th Quicksilver album in 35 years—an impressive achievement of excellence (for the most part, see here) and longevity even before you consider the lengthy roster of master musicians in that stretch whom Lawson has trained up and sent forth.

Eli Johnston (bass guitar) and Dustin Pyrtle (guitar) are up to the difficult task of sharing lead, duet, and trio vocal duties with Lawson, and I wouldn’t be surprised if their names were one day added to the list of storied Quicksilver vets. (However, I’m not familiar yet with either one, and just from the liner notes, I can’t be sure who’s who from track to track).

Jason Barie (fiddle), Joe Dean (banjo), and Josh Swift (Dobro, guitar, and, yes, percussion) create a hard instrumental bluegrass edge on “Climbing Upward,” “Will You Go?,” and the delightfully McCouryesque “It’s Done” and country-gospel backing on “He Made the Tree,” “O Far Country,” and the album-opening “Coming Soon,” which might be the track you’d pick from this project to demonstrate how Lawson can blend together bluegrass and Southern gospel, old and new.

But what I love most about DLQ are the quartet recordings—whether a cappella or with solo guitar— that owe as much to the likes of black groups like the Golden Gate Quartet as to white groups like the gospel quartets of Bill Monroe and Ralph Stanley. There are four great examples of that here: “Get on Board” (an old spiritual to which Lawson added a new final verse), “Lead Me to that Fountain” (with a perfectly understated bass vocal from Swift), “He’s In Control,” and the stunning nostalgia of “I Sailed Back.” Classic Quicksilver.

Standing Tall and Tough has Lawson back with Crowe and their fellow Martin alumnus Paul Williams for a second trio CD, and it’s as good as 2010’s Old Friends Get Together, with the more famous contributors content with creating a well-blended band sound that allows Williams’ grand voice to steal the show.

That disc was an all-gospel affair; this one isn’t. Lawson’s liner notes indicate that the trio wanted to do “a few songs that we hadn’t recorded during our time working with Jimmy Martin.”

There is a nucleus of Martin songs here: the Martin/Williams co-writes “My Walking Shoes,” “Little Angel in Heaven,” and “Pretending I Don’t Care,” as well as Williams’ peerless version of “Fraulein.”

Three Louvin Brothers songs—”Do You Live What You Preach?,” “Don’t Laugh,” and “Insured Beyond the Grave”—also get a masterful treatment, as do Bill Anderson’s “Once a Day” and the Jimmy Wakely/Johnny Bond “Those Gone and Left Me Blues.”

Williams stops the show with his version of “The Hills of Roane County”, his operatic tenor spinning out one of the strangest story songs in bluegrass prompting the chills up the spine just like Roy Orbison could on songs like “Leah” or “It’s Over.” (Has anyone suggested to Williams that he cut a record of Orbison covers?)

Lawson’s touch as producer is quite evident on Open Carefully, much less so on Standing Tall. But that’s what a great producer like Lawson does.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Live at the Isis” by Town Mountain

Town Mountain
Live at the Isis
self-released

3 stars (out of 5)

By Donald Teplyske

Asheville, North Carolina’s Town Mountain hasn’t released an album since Leave the Bottle broke through in 2012. That well-received disc opened some doors for the quintet, and it appears that they have been on the road for much of the interim.

They won a couple of IBMA Momentum Awards in 2013, and their name has been mentioned as one that needs to be experienced ‘live’ for full effect. Not surprising then that they’ve put together a set recorded earlier this year to encourage table sales until the next recording is ready to go.

Live at the Isis includes a handful of songs from Leave the Bottle—including the exceptional “Lawdog” and the impressive “Up the Ladder,” a soulful bluegrass song that I quite appreciate. Selections from earlier releases include “Tarheel Boys” and “Texas/New Mexico Line.” Another older song, “5 Shots of Whiskey,” reaches quite a ways past bluegrass into Americana/country-shuffle territory.

Town Mountain features a new bassist with this release as Nick DiSebastian signs on. The core of the band— vocalists Robert Greer (guitar), Phil Barker (mandolin), and Jesse Langlais (banjo) with fiddler Bobby Britt—remains consistent.

The recording does sound a bit flat to my ears, much like a show simply captured off the soundboard often does. Perhaps that is the case here, but one would expect more effort to have gone into the live recording to ensure the dynamic qualities of the band’s performance were fully captured.

I must admit I never need to have another live bluegrass album include “Orange Blossom Special,” no matter how ably it is performed; who are the folks who are actually clamoring to hear that one over and over again?

Hardly an essential recording, Live at the Isis provides those of us who have yet to see the band live a small (31 minute!) sample of their show. That the recording is a bit aurally soft is a disappointment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

LRR’s picks for the 2014 International Bluegrass Music Awards

The 25th Annual International Bluegrass Music Awards show is Thursday, Oct. 2 in Raleigh.

Here are Aaron, Donald, and Larry’s picks from the final ballot IBMA voters were presented with. (Aaron is an IBMA voting member.)

One suggested change: If a someone has won a particular vocalist or instrumentalist award more than five times, why not make him ineligible for future awards in order to give others a chance? I don’t think Del McCoury, Adam Steffey, or Michael Cleveland would mind.—AKH

ENTERTAINER OF THE YEAR

Aaron and Larry’s pick:
Dailey & Vincent

Donald’s pick:
The Gibson Brothers

Other nominees:
Balsam Range
Blue Highway
The Del McCoury Band

VOCAL GROUP OF THE YEAR

Donald and Larry’s pick:
Balsam Range

Aaron’s pick:
Dailey & Vincent

Other nominees:
Blue Highway
The Gibson Brothers
Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver

INSTRUMENTAL GROUP OF THE YEAR

Aaron’s pick:
The Del McCoury Band

Donald’s pick:
Blue Highway

Larry’s pick:
The Boxcars

Other nominees:
Balsam Range
Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen

SONG OF THE YEAR

Aaron and Donald’s pick:
“Grandpa’s Way of Life” – The Spinney Brothers (artist), Mark ‘Brink’ Brinkman (writer)

Larry’s pick:
“You Took All The Ramblin’ Out of Me” – The Boxcars (artist), Jerry Hubbard (writer)

Other nominees:
“Dear Sister” – Claire Lynch (artist), Claire Lynch and Louisa Branscomb (writers)
“It’s Just a Road” – The Boxcars (artist), William Keith Garrett (writer)
“The Game” – Blue Highway (artist), Shawn Lane and Barry Bales (writers)

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

Aaron’s pick:
Hall of Fame Bluegrass – Junior Sisk and Joe Mullins (artist), Junior Sisk and Joe Mullins (producers), Rebel Records

Donald’s pick:
Streets of Baltimore – The Del McCoury Band (artist), Del McCoury (producer),  McCoury Music

Larry’s pick:
It’s Just A Road – The Boxcars (artist), The Boxcars (producer), Mountain Home LS

Other nominees:
Noam Pikelny Plays Kenny Baker Plays Bill Monroe – Noam Pikelny (artist) Gabe Witcher (producer), Compass Records
The Game – Blue Highway (artist), Blue Highway (producer), Rounder Records

GOSPEL RECORDED PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR

Aaron’s pick:
“Won’t It Be Wonderful There” – Dailey & Vincent (artist), Brothers of the Highway (album), Mildred Styles Johnson (writer), Jamie Dailey and Darrin Vincent (producers), Rounder Records

Donald’s pick:
“Love Does” – Darin and Brooke Aldridge (artist), Flying (album), Jamie Johnson, Suzanne M. Johnson and Jenee Fleenor (writers), Darin and Brooke Aldridge (producers), Organic Record

Larry’s pick:

“The Day We Learn to Fly” – Volume Five (artist), The Day We Learn To Fly (album), Stacy Richardson and Leroy Drumm (writers), Volume Five (producers), Mountain Fever LS

Other nominees:
“Wait A Little Longer Please Jesus” – Donna Ulisse (artist), I Am a Child of God (album), Hazel Marie Houser (writer), Bryan Sutton and Donna Ulisse (producers), Hadley Music Group
“When Sorrows Encompass Me Around” – The Boxcars (artist), It’s Just A Road (album), Paul Edgar Johnson (writer), The Boxcars (producer), Mountain Home

INSTRUMENTAL RECORDED PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR

Aaron’s pick:
“Johnny Don’t Get Drunk” – Adam Steffey (artist), New Primitive (album),  Public Domain, Adam Steffey (producer), Organic

Donald’s pick:
“Thank God I’m A Country Boy”- Special Consensus with Buddy Spicher, Michael Cleveland and Alison Brown (artists), Country Boy: A Bluegrass Tribute to John Denver (album), John Martin Sommers (wrtier), Alison Brown (producer), Compass Records

Larry’s pick:
“Five Miles to Milan” – The Grascals (artist), When I Get My Pay (album), Danny Roberts (writer), The Grascals (producer), Mountain Home

Other nominees:
“Graveyard Fields” – Steep Canyon Rangers (artist), Tell The Ones I Love (album), Mike Guggino (writer), Larry Campbell (producer), Rounder Records
“Skillet Head Derailed” – The Boxcars (artist), It’s Just a Road (album), Ron Stewart (writer), The Boxcars (producer), Mountain Home

RECORDED EVENT OF THE YEAR

Aaron’s pick:
“Keepin’ It Between the Lines (Old School)” – Peter Rowan with Bobby Osborne, Jesse McReynolds, Ronnie McCoury and Del McCoury (artists), Alison Brown (producer), Compass Records

Donald’s pick:
“Martha White, Lester & Earl” – Terry Baucom with Marty Raybon & Buddy Melton (artists), Terry and Cindy Baucom (producers), John Boy and Billy Records

Larry’s pick:
“Wild Mountain Honey” – Junior Sisk and Joe Mullins (artists), Junior Sisk and Joe Mullins (producers) Rebel Records

Other nominees:
“American Pickers”- The Grascals with Dierks Bentley (artists), The Grascals (producer), Mountain Home
“Wild Montana Skies” – Special Consensus with Claire Lynch & Rob Ickes (artists), Alison Brown (producer), Compass Records

EMERGING ARTIST OF THE YEAR

Aaron and Larry’s pick:
Flatt Lonesome

Donald’s pick:
Town Mountain

Other nominees:
Detour
The Spinney Brothers
Volume Five

MALE VOCALIST OF THE YEAR

Aaron and Donald’s pick:
Del McCoury

Larry’s pick:

Buddy Melton

Other nominees:

Tim O’Brien
Frank Solivan
Dan Tyminski

FEMALE VOCALIST OF THE YEAR

Aaron’s pick:
Claire Lynch

Donald’s pick:
Dale Ann Bradley

Larry’s pick:
Rhonda Vincent

Other nominees:
Alison Krauss
Amanda Smith

INSTRUMENTAL PERFORMERS OF THE YEAR

BANJO

Aaron and Donald’s pick:
Noam Pikelny

Larry’s pick:
Ron Stewart

Other nominees:

Jens Kruger
Mike Munford
Sammy Shelor

BASS

Aaron and Larry’s pick:
Mike Bub

Donald’s pick:
Barry Bales

Other nominees:
Missy Raines
Mark Schatz
Darrin Vincent

FIDDLE

Aaron and Donald’s pick:
Michael Cleveland

Larry’s pick:

Ron Stewart

Other nominees:

Jason Carter
Stuart Duncan
Bobby Hicks

DOBRO

Aaron’s pick:

Rob Ickes

Donald and Larry’s pick:

Phil Leadbetter

Other nominees:

Jerry Douglas
Andy Hall
Randy Kohrs

GUITAR

Aaron, Donald, and Larry’s pick:
James Alan Shelton

Other nominees:
Tony Rice
Kenny Smith
Tim Stafford
Bryan Sutton

MANDOLIN

Aaron and Larry’s pick:
Adam Steffey

Donald’s pick:
Frank Solivan

Other nominees:
Sam Bush
Sierra Hull
Chris Thile

“Blue Smoke” by Dolly Parton

Dolly Parton
Blue Smoke
Sony Masterworks

2 stars (out of 5)

By Donald Teplyske

Dolly Parton has been making country music for well over fifty years, some of it wonderfully timeless.

In this category, I would place a range of her releases, including early albums such as Just Because I’m A Woman, Coat of Many Colors, and My Tennessee Mountain Home, almost all of those RCA singles from 1968-1979, the reinvigorated burst of early 90s energy on White Limozeen, Eagle When She Flies, and Slow Dancing With The Moon, to more recent recordings including Hungry Again and the Sugar Hill ‘bluegrass’ trilogy that started with The Grass Is Blue in 1999.

But some of the Parton catalog is unquestionably rather disposable—over-produced, throwaway albums; multiple slick duets and soundtrack songs no one needs to remember; silly concepts (2005’s Those Were The Days, for instance); and the plain ill-conceived: 1984’s The Great Pretender and covers of “Walking On Sunshine” and “Peace Train” that will never make sense to me.

One sometimes wonders what Dolly is thinking, but we are impressed by both her longevity and the balls she brings to much of her music. Unfortunately, Blue Smoke has more in common with the questionable aspects of Parton’s recording history.

Blue Smoke has a couple things going for it. Parton re-imagines “Banks of the Ohio” a little, taking on the role of the murderer’s confessor; joined by Bryan Sutton (guitar), Stuart Duncan (fiddle), and especially Carl Jackson (vocals), a fresh interpretation of the oft-recorded classic is achieved. Overwrought it may be, “Unlikely Angel” is the kind of sentimental song that has served Parton well over the years, and features Sonya Isaacs and Rebecca Isaacs Bowman vocally. “If I Had Wings” is similarly overly emotive, but remains listenable.

The pulsing title track starts off promising, but goes off the rails when Parton and album producer Kent Wells insert a little too much into the proceedings: this snapping, southern sing-a-long could have been great, but ‘clickety clack’ and ‘choo-choo, woo-woo’ are a bit much, as is the mid-song testimonial. It becomes a bit of a—forgive me—train wreck. Three of the male Grascals appear here either instrumentally or vocally, as does the deep-voiced Christian Davis.

The majority of the album is tinged in desperation. “Lover Du Jour” comes off as pathetic, “Miss You-Miss Me” is cringe inducing, and “Try” is just plain heavy handed. A song that could have been good, “Home” is beaten down by relentless drums, guitar effects, and confused production choices. Duets with Kenny Rogers (“You Can’t Make Old Friends”) and Willie Nelson (“From Here to the Moon and Back”) are better than expected, but both were previously released elsewhere.

A cover of Bon Jovi’s “Lay Your Hands On Me” is supposed to be part of her, in Dolly’s words, “never-ending desire to try to uplift mankind.” Unfortunately, there is nothing inspirational about the song, and Parton’s revamping of the lyrics and inserting the occasional ‘Lord’ to the proceedings does nothing to bridge a fairly significant gulf between the self-indulgent, hair-metal original and Parton’s attempt at country gospel. At least she didn’t try to reinvent “Every Rose Has A Thorn” as a crucifixion observance.

I love Dolly Parton’s music. I love the spunky firebrand image she has created, the assertiveness with which she conducts herself, and I appreciate her commitment to her home community. “The Bargain Store,” “Joshua,” and “The Seeker” are three of the greatest songs ever written, regardless of genre.

So it pains me to write a review of Blue Smoke that is largely negative. But, that’s how it goes. If you unleash a stinker, someone has to call you on it.

And, she has.