"Adkins & Loudermilk" by Adkins & Loudermilk

Adkins & Loudermilk
Adkins & Loudermilk
Mountain Fever Records

4½ stars (out of 5)

By Larry Stephens

If you use names like Monroe, Scruggs, Flatt, and Martin to define bluegrass, you can throw in Adkins and Loudermilk. There has always been a lot of room in the traditional bluegrass world to encompass differences in style and lyrics. The Stanley Brothers differ from Monroe who differs from the McReynolds Brothers. Edgar Loudermilk (IIIrd Tyme Out, Rhonda Vincent, Marty Raybon) and Dave Adkins (Republik Steel) are carving out their own niche.

This CD features a number of tracks composed by Adkins and/or Loudermilk but the one that may catch your attention on the first listen is an old public domain number that’s been recorded by innumerable artists in a variety of genre. I don’t recall hearing “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” done like an easy country ballad before, but I like it. A number that could lose some bluegrassers in the audience is Hoyt Axton’s “[Never Been To] Spain,” but it does give the musicians and singers a chance to vamp. Adkins is a good singer with a voice that gets more coarse as he drives up the force of his vocal, reminding me of Junior Sisk. Loudermilk is a ballad singer with a lot of range, easily getting down into the bass register. Loudermilk plays bass, while Glen Crain plays Dobro and sings harmony. Zack Autry plays mandolin and his father Jeff Autry plays guitar. Chris Wade plays banjo for the band. These are excellent musicians and the numbers are tastefully arranged and recorded. They stretch their legs on “Spain” but, overall, this picking will stand the test of bluegrass audiences.

“Where Do You Go When You Dream” touches on one of music’s favorite topics, love. It’s a question that has crossed the minds of many lovers: is she dreaming about me or…? “Blacksmoke George” (composed by Adkins and former bandmate, Wayne Benson) is darker, the story of a hunt for a badman that doesn’t end up well for the hunter. Love and murder, staples of bluegrass though they aren’t intertwined in this number. “Mournful Soul” is another dark song that for some reason calls “Long Black Veil” to my mind, even though they sound nothing alike. It’s another chance for some fine trading of the lead break between the guitar and banjo. Switching styles, “Georgia Mountain Man” (Loudermilk, Russell Moore and Wayne Benson) is all about growing up in a country home, learning sound values for your life, while “Cut The Rope” (Adkins) is an uptempo song that has an outlook that’s been echoed in spirit by many. Love ties two people together so, “if you’re going to walk away and leave me behind,” cut the rope. “Turn Off The Love” has a similar message but done as a heartbreaking ballad that would make a great country song. The band turns up the heat and tempo with “Backside of Losing,” a story about bad choices in life.

Good music, good bluegrass that will be welcomed on most any bluegrass stage. Mix in some fun with “Spain” and you have a good CD. Adkins and Loudermilk are on a road that should lead to continued success.